Scapegoats

Christchurch, Conservatism, and Fascism. Matthew Pinna – “In fact, conservatism had nothing to do with this. We need to understand exactly how people like this shooter think, and how the media is doing that admirable goal a disservice.

“Both media and public officials, in New Zealand and elsewhere have chosen to lay the blame for the killings on “conservatives.”

How do we know that the shooter isn’t a conservative? For starters, he explicitly says that he detests conservatism twice, once in the “Q&A” and again in his more ideological section, where he devotes a whole page to it

Instead, the shooter admits that he is an “actual fascist” — an “eco-fascist,” to be exact.

It needs to be understood that the racism and discrimination seen from historical examples of fascism aren’t mere elements or curable side effects of the ideology — they are fascism.

people need to stay out of the way of those who want to fight back. Don’t sweep what he wrote under the rug and don’t blame Republicans or Democrats for “radicalizing” this shooter. Now more than ever, we need to debate specifically against Fascists — just as we did against Communists back in the day — for Christchurch, and the future Christchurches that will happen unless we change our course.

The New Zealand shooting stopped when a brave man took away the shooter’s gun. John Sexton – “As usual, after an event like this, the shooter is getting a lot of attention. It’s understandable though it doesn’t seem that complicated in this case. Hopefully, we’ll learn more about some of the victims and the people who were heroes in the worst situation imaginable.” And maybe learn about how the social phobia about guns hindered their efforts?

Observations on Christchurch. John Hinderaker – “Early reports of catastrophic events like these always turn out to be wrong in some respects, but it does appear that armed self-defense was the key to the less tragic outcome at Linwood. Murder is the result of human evil and will never be eradicated in this world, but if more people arm themselves, there will be fewer mass murder events.

“The deplorable Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tied the murders to President Trump. It is noteworthy that liberals attribute almost superhuman powers to Donald Trump, attributing responsibility to him for pretty much anything that goes on in the world. The only phenomena for which the Left does not assign responsibility to the president are the intended, beneficent results of his own policies.

2) Brenton Tarrant published a typical mass murderer’s manifesto in which he described himself as an “eco-fascist,” expressed hatred for conservatism and said that Communist China is his ideal country. Tarrant is an environmentalist who bought the global warming hype hook, line and sinker. His closest analogy is perhaps the Unabomber. …

3) From a policy standpoint, the only lesson that can be drawn from the Christchurch massacre is reflected in the difference in the casualty totals between the two attacks. Forty-one were killed at the Dean Ave. mosque, the first one that was targeted, where the murderer had plenty of time and at one point returned to his vehicle to reload. There were only seven killed at the Linwood mosque because one of the worshippers was armed:

Hossenfelder demands $10,000 from me through Czech lawyers. Luboš Motl – “The letter is formulated as if she demands a ransom. It adds a new level to her debatable methods to earn money.

“I think it’s absolutely stunning. She’s on her violent campaign against the whole field that I find dear and against its practitioners and she just wants to silence me …

My knowledge of the law is next to non-existent. I have no idea whether a party that is attacked in this Blitzkrieg way has an effective way to defend itself. I don’t know whom I would be inviting as a witness to show that she’s been helped by affirmative action, her physics is not good etc. Your recommendations are welcome. If you’re extremely rich, your financial help would be welcome, too.

The current Tucker Carlson saga is another example of this approach to ideological warfare. Threaten, intimidate, attrit their resources, humiliate, shut them down. The media is complicit, too. Consider this headline: “Twelve Righteous Republicans (and 41 Cowards) (Bret Stephens/New York Times)” – it’s not about the merits, it’s about ad hominem judgment. Contrast that to neo’s cite of Tom Cotton.

Trump vetoes Senate’s block on his emergency declaration. neo – “They say it’s not because they don’t like the wall, but because they think the president exceeded his powers. … When I looked into the powers presidents have been given to declare national emergencies, I think it’s fairly clear that Trump did not exceed his powers.” There is an interesting contrast that Congress did vote on executive regulations that Trump put before them early in his administration. Here’s from Tom Cotton:

“Now, I’m sympathetic to arguments that the National Emergencies Act is too broad and gives the executive branch too much power. That’s a reasonable debate to have. Believe me, Congress has ceded too much power to the executive for more than a century, expanding an administrative state that increasingly deprives our people of a meaningful say in their government. So I invite my Democratic colleagues to reconsider the wisdom of this path. Maybe we can reform the EPA. Perhaps we can require up-or-down votes in Congress to approve big regulations so politicians can show some accountability for once. I’m ready for those debates. Believe me, I’m ready. But in the meantime, don’t pretend we didn’t delegate all these powers, or that it’s lawless for the executive to use laws we passed, just because you deplore him.

What Trump does not do…and it’s fantastic. Majid Mohammadi – “I will provide examples of what Trump has not done and what King Barack H. Obama and King George W. Bush did. Here is a list

“When Democrats lost to a non-politician in 2016, they could not swallow the failure and began to degrade their opponent’s victory (by manufacturing “Russia collusion”), insult people who voted for the winner (calling them racist), and assassinate the character of the winner (calling him a dictator). To make the case for the third act, they invented a story that Donald Trump likes dictators and wants to be one and will not leave office if not elected in 2020. But his actions show the opposite. Trump does not want to be a king or a dictator, while his predecessors behaved as if they wanted to be.

A scapegoat is one thing. The judgment is another. The total lack of support in reality for vehement name calling is another. It isn’t getting better. It seems to be getting worse.

 

Comments are closed.