McCabe: case study on how to handle being caught with blood on your hands.

McCabe fired by Don Surber – “Look for a legal challenge, a book deal, and being officially placed on the CNN payroll after years of illegal leaks to the Fake News network.” The reaction to the firing is instructive. McCabe himself is outraged and making accusations about cover-up and worse on his political or supposed enemies. His friends are also full of denial and venom and they parade the public with their faux outrage and fantasies.

Ace: Sessions Fires McCabe; McCabe Claims It’s All a Conspiracy To Damage Him as a Witness. Other stories indicate a lawsuit for improper dismissal and denial of pension citing Trump Tweets etc.

After firing, McCabe claims he’s a victim of administration’s ‘war on the FBI’ by John Sexton – “McCabe doesn’t say he’s completely blameless, only that he’s paying too big a price for what was merely a misunderstanding.”

“Already, the reactions to the firing are falling into two distinct camps. On the one hand, there are those claiming this is justice:
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On the other hand, McCabe issued a lengthy statement claiming this is part of a Trump administration “war on the FBI” and, more specifically, an attempt to discredit his testimony
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So was this just a big misunderstanding? One former supervisory special agent with the FBI who describes himself as a “fan” of McCabe, says it’s difficult for him to believe the Office of Professional Responsibility, which recommended McCabe firing, is acting politically. … He concludes that while this move may benefit AG Sessions and the White House, that doesn’t automatically prove it’s some kind of partisan setup.

Don’t Ignore the Obvious – Key Words from AG Sessions: “Including Under Oath” by sundance – “Don’t be so blinded by the tripwire flares you fail to see the obvious. Within the statement from Attorney General Sessions hopefully you’ll note: “Including Under Oath”

“The IG doesn’t place the internal investigative target “under oath”. An outside prosecutor who is assisting the IG does. Hence Attorney General Jeff Sessions is telling us what is going on

House Intel Dem to Trump: ‘Gloat now, but you will be fired soon’ by Jacqueline Thomsen – one of several she has this morning at The Hill.

CNN’s absurd reaction to Andrew McCabe’s firing by Patricia McCarthy – “Channel surfing after the announcement that AG Sessions had indeed fired Andrew McCabe was like being yanked into the Twilight Zone.”

“Switch to CNN and one would be told that it was Trump who did the firing, that Sessions did it to keep his job. Barely mentioned was the fact that the recommendation to fire McCabe came from the FBI’s own Office of Personal Responsibility (OPR), an almost unprecedented event. Don Lemon and his guests were apoplectic that this “fine and respected” man has had his pension taken away. They were not concerned at all about what he may have done to elicit the OPR’s recommendation that he be fired. Not one bit.
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Like Adam Schiff, the folks at CNN, CBS, MSNBC, etc. have apparently avoided all the news that has been revealed over the past year that proves it was Hillary and the DNC that commissioned and paid for the ridiculous dossier. We know now that many of the higher-ups in the DOJ and the FBI colluded to prevent Trump from winning, and after he won, to see that he did not take office
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The rest of the mainstream media, equally committed to the hoped-for impeachment scenario, also ignores all the facts that have come to light. They are grasping at straws and Stormy Daniels is just the latest straw. Their hysteria would be comical if it were not so deadly serious. What these people, the Clintons, the DNC, these schemers at the DOJ, NSA and FBI, have done is the biggest political scandal in modern American history. They have been exposed as arrogant elitists who believe they are above the law and have ruined the reputations of their respective institutions.

Trump fatigue and good news by Silvio Canto, Jr. – “Over the last week, we’ve heard about “chaos,” “personnel changes,” “Stormygate,” and lots of other things.”

“Like the old story about the kid who cried wolf, this constant anti-Trump drumming gets old after a while. In Aesop’s fable, the townspeople just tuned out the kid. Today, the negativity is so over the top that it becomes hysterical noise.

The problem with negativity is that it can’t compete with good news, as we see in these examples:

Mueller’s Investigation Flouts Justice Department Standards by Andrew C. McCarthy – “These columns have many times observed Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s failure to set limits on Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.”

“With Rosenstein’s passive approval, Mueller is shredding Justice Department charging policy by alleging earth-shattering crimes, then cutting a sweetheart deal that shields the defendant from liability for those crimes and from the penalties prescribed by Congress. The special counsel, moreover, has become a legislature unto himself, promulgating the new, grandiose crime of “conspiracy against the United States” by distorting the concept of “fraud.”

Why does the special counsel need to invent an offense to get a guilty plea? Why doesn’t he demand a plea to one of the several truly egregious statutory crimes he claims have been committed?

The Mueller switch project by Scott Johnson – “The Mueller project to continues on its inevitable path, yet every day the synthetic Trump-Russia collusion scandal appears more absurd.”

“The Mueller project, not to put too fine a point on it, is to remove President Trump from office. Thikn of it as the Mueller switch project. You’d have to be a fool not to see it. Yet that is far from the only problem with it.

Special Counsel is not a creature of statue; his appointment and jurisdiction is governed by regulations promulgated by the Department of Justice. Unlike many regulations, these are relatively brief and to the point. They are accessible online here. Under the applicable regulation, Special Counsel may be appointed when the Attorney General or his surrogate “determines that criminal investigation of a person or matter is warranted,” and that the Justice Department’s handling of “that investigation or prosecution of that person or matter” in the normal course “would present a conflict of interest for the Department” (emphasis added).
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Mueller’s appointment lacks a legal predicate. This failure is fundamental.
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These departures from law and practice cannot be justified by necessity or the supposed good works of Mueller’s probe. The Mueller investigation remains a continuing affront to due process. As I say, one would have to to be a fool not to see the object of Mueller’s probe. I am not an optimist by nature, but I think one would also have to be a fool to doubt that there will be a day of reckoning.

Ace: The Real Collusion Story: How Hillary, the DNC, Brennan, Clapper and Obama Conspired to Frame Trump for a Crime That Never Even Happened – Citing a TL;DR as a ‘must read’ at National Review: This is the real story, the one that Washington Consensus doesn’t know.

Stormy Daniel’s Attorney Worked For Barack Obama’s White House Chief Of Staff by DCWhispers – “The Establishment Media is working double-time to try and make something of the sordid Stormy Daniel allegations that she had a brief affair with Donald Trump ten years ago” but it begins to look like a political opposition taking advantage of a celebrity troll.

Meanwhile, Trump lawyer claims up to $20m in damages – “Donald Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, wants a lawsuit brought by porn actress Stormy Daniels moved to federal court, and claims the woman could owe $20 million in damages for violating a non-disclosure agreement.” It looks like there is some learning from the Left in how to respond. Jazz Shaw has some confusion that points to a nuance he is missing: Trump’s lawyer wants Stormy Daniels to cough up $20M for… something – “Trump should really just get it over with and dare her to put all her cards on the table.” Since Daniel has little that will damage Trump, perhaps there is something for Trump in having the media distracted by the story and belittling itself with its meaningless obsession. See also Steven Hayward’s week in pictures.

Let the Boys Fight: Why Anti-Bullying Policies Fail and Why Fighting May Be the Answer by Megan Fox – “What stops a bully? Physical force. Every time.”

“Unlike the millions of wasted dollars the federal and state governments spend on speakers and programs to stop students from bullying one another (that ultimately fail), Gracie jiu-jitsu has tried and true methods that have worked since the beginning of time. It gives kids physical training to neutralize a bully and get away quickly, but everything they teach goes against almost every school bullying policy. Most schools have a “zero tolerance” policy for aggressive behavior, including all hitting, punching, kicking and wrestling. There is no exception for self-defense. This means that if your child is being hounded by bullies and one day your kid snaps and puts the hurt on another kid, your kid is getting expelled, not the culprit.

Gone are the days when Johnny met Steven down by the bike rack to duke it out, shake hands, and become buddies. Now schools are focused almost solely on limiting all physical contact. The problem with this is that males especially need the physical contact of grappling and wrestling to establish boundaries, hierarchy, or just blow off steam. (Girls, on the other hand, will terrorize a target emotionally, which is far more damaging than a bloody lip.)
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Where is a boy’s natural aggression going to go if he has no outlet and is told he is unable to defend himself, even when under attack?

An issue here is age. Prior to high school, physical conflict injury risk is rather small. After puberty, the boy gains size and muscle and that increases risk. The traditional means of reducing that risk is conflict via rules via boxing, wrestling, or other sports.

The case against education: A long-read Q&A with Bryan Caplan by James Pethokoukis – “The American education system is a waste of both time and money — at least according to Bryan Caplan, author of the new book, The Case Against Education.”

“Rather than actually impart useful skills, education’s benefits stem mainly from “signaling,” implying that as a nation we could drastically reduce years of schooling and be no worse off. It’s an explosive thesis challenging the conventional wisdom of labor economists, and he recently joined me on the podcast to convince me of its merit and explain its implications for student, parents, and society.
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Another problem going on is that by the time that someone emerges from American high school not really proficient in literacy and numeracy, they are in no mood to go to do some online education at that point. They are frustrated, they are angry, and of course mostly male and are like “No I’m not going to go and try some other kind of school now. I am sick of this.”

The massive growth in the cost of college in recent years is stimulating talk of a bubble. So much is put into such an effort ‘for the children’ yet what many are seeing is indoctrination and frivolousness and not an education. College is shifting from skill and intellectual development into a signalling certification.

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