Blowback: enough already. The ‘other’ side is gaining its voice.

There’s blowback. Whether it’s objection to lecturing by the cast of a Broadway play, to disputing the presumptions in news interviews, to cataloging misbehaviors, there is a fresh breeze in the public square. Feldman provides one example in the previous post. Here are two more.

Jazz Shaw reports that The time has come for the “Suck it up, Buttercup” bill

We’ve long since grown used to stories coming from the nation’s college campuses where “safe spaces” are set up for everything from Halloween costumes to the results of the presidential election. But some universities have taken it a step further, setting up special counseling sessions for “grieving” students and additional classes, much of it on the taxpayer dime. The Ivy League schools have gone so far as to consider making themselves miniature “sanctuary cities” to protect illegal immigrants on campus from anticipated increases in law enforcement efforts.

One GOP member of the Iowa state legislature decided earlier this week that the madness needs to stop and has introduced a bill being very appropriately nicknamed the Suck It Up, Buttercup Act.

There’s more to this legislation than meets the eye. The top line item is the obvious one, providing for cuts to funding for schools which could add up to double what they spend on all of this safe space and hand wringing activity.

But a second feature of this bill will, I’m guessing, garner a lot more popular support. It proposes to impose additional criminal penalties on people who intentionally block the highways as part of their “protests and free speech.”

David Rosenthal A New Defense for Religious Liberty: Going on Offense against Bad Laws

It is no secret that religious liberty is under attack. The wedding photographer, florist, and cake baker are no longer able to practice their faith at work without fear of retribution for refusing to fall in line with the new government orthodoxy.

One way to preserve the American conscience is for individuals to pre-emptively put unjust laws on trial by way of pre-enforcement challenges.

Pre-enforcement challenges have a long pedigree in free speech cases, which carries over into the religious liberty context.

ith the principle in mind, ADF recently launched a pre-enforcement challenge in support of religious liberty on behalf of clients in Arizona.

The culture war will rage on, but pre-enforcement challenges have the potential to provide refuge for conscientious objectors who want to live out their faith in the marketplace without fear of prosecution for doing so. It is time to put bad laws on trial before bad laws are able to do worse to conscientious objectors.

To date, it’s been the riots, the over-riding of individual liberties, the libel and slander, and the destruction of culture that has dominated the news. It is about time that the opposition to such efforts stands up for its day in the ‘debate.’

Comments are closed.