Powerline connecting the dots – people who can’t think

The Powerline blog hits three current stories that connect dots, illustrate a theme, and provide some sense to nonsense. First, Hinderaker explains why he thinks Trump will win.

At one point, when I was opposing Trump during the GOP primaries, I said to the press: Stop attacking Trump! Liberal reporters often began with a valid point, but their hysterical hatred for Trump caused them to go too far, making arguments that were patently unfair and unsustainable. Therefore, the more they attacked Trump the more his support grew. The same thing is happening now: most Americans have a pretty good sense of fair play, and they know that Trump is being treated badly by the establishment–a group for whom most Americans have no great affection.

Then Johnson picks up a comment about a Clinton and Kain book and sets the stage:

Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine claim the authorship of the campaign manifesto Stronger Together, released in paperback by Simon and Schuster on September 6.

The book isn’t doing well commercially. Who wants to pay to read a party platform, even at a paperback price lower if it were published in hardcover? I’m holding out for the post-election remainder price.

At InstaPundit yesterday Glenn Reynolds mentioned the “amusing” reviews the book has garnered at Amazon. Could the “reviews” represent a groundswell of revulsion of the kind reflected in the famous Boston Globe editorial decrying “Mush from the wimp” in March 1980? I should like to think so.

Despite what he says, the commenter is not in the target market for Clinton’s manifesto. He knows too much. His memory is too good. He is too well informed.

The comment (at the link) is satire and its impact is a measure of what you know about the Clinton scandal history.

Then its another Hinderaker comment about three violent attacks where the authorities struggle vainly to support the view that they are independent and have nothing to do with Islamic terrorism or any other commonality.

Three stories have hit the news almost simultaneously; consider the features they have in common. In Philadelphia, a 25-year-old man named Nicholas Glenn walked up to a police car and started firing on the two officers inside. He then shot four civilians, one of whom died, before being cornered and killed by police officers. Glenn left behind a letter “in which he expressed hatred toward police and probation officers.”

In New York, a Palestinian named Akram Joudeh was picked up two months ago while screaming “Allahu akbar” outside a Brooklyn synagogue. He was ordered deported, and was in Midtown on Thursday appealing his deportation notice when he started attacking bystanders with a meat cleaver.

This morning, a “suspicious backpack” was discovered shortly before the race was to begin, causing organizers to cancel the event. Not long thereafter, a pipe bomb exploded in a garbage can along the route

Yeah, maybe not organized and ideologically based terrorism but it is the same fundamental issue that has NFL players playing games with the national anthem and others whose ‘free speech’ is based on ignorance and indoctrination from false propaganda. The lack of intellectual integrity is on parade. Maybe there is pushback. We will see.

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