13 hours for denial in the State Propaganda Machine

Ed takes a look at a WaPo columnist: Say, this 13 Hours actually is political and observes:

The real objection is when a film becomes partisan, not political. The American President would have been a fine comedy if it had not been ruined by its harsh partisan bent. My Fellow Americans was a much better film because it poked fun at the partisan divide. Both were political, but only one was dishonest about its intent. That’s the issue, and Hornaday admits smack in the middle that she doesn’t have a case; she just wants to gripe about the narrative.

Honesty adds to the story. Even when fiction, honesty to intent can make or break the story. A good story builds trust in the story teller as a story teller and not as a propagandist trying to scam you. The Benghazi movie is in the tradition of heroes who are telling their own story. By all (honest) accounts, it is well done and a good action thriller. Compare and contrast to that movie about Rathergate to see the kind of difference that Ed is talking about between partisan and political.

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