A matter of integrity

Robert Sp[encer says “What disturbs people is not the Pope’s authority for his views but his seeming unawareness of opposing evidence”. He cites “On Pope Francis and Church Integrity,” by Rev. James V. Schall, S.J., Crisis.

we might say that the Pope’s positions are backed by scholarly opinions. The only trouble with this approach is that other scholars in both areas find evidence that the opposite views are more persuasive and valid. What disturbs people is not the Pope’s authority for his views but his seeming unawareness of opposing evidence.

To be in error on a matter of scientific opinion is, of course, not exactly heresy. It happens every day. Indeed, it is the nature of scientific method of testing and retesting. Likewise, to be wrong (or right) about earth warming is not a matter of faith.

But if the Church takes a position in the matters of, say, evolution, science, or economics that turns out, on further investigation, to be wrong or doubtful, it will seem untrustworthy also in areas over which it does claim competence. However tempting or popular to comment on, there are some things on which the Church should just avoid taking a stand.

Galileo provided a lesson and that case still impugns the integrity of the Church. Will they never learn? When the boundaries between politics, religion, and science become clouded, all lose.

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