The war within and a legacy fifty years on

The Ferguson protesters are getting a bit upset because they have not received promised payments. The history of such a paid army working in such a manner is not new. Scott Johnson introduces Bryan Burrough’s Days of Rage: America’s Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence.

The book covers the period 1969-1985 in telling the story of six homegrown radical groups that conducted terrorist campaigns against the United States. Their operations in total included thousands of bombings of skyscrapers, federal buildings and businesses from coast to coast. … The operations of the radical groups also included scores of bank robberies and assassinations of police officers. … Did I say mention that the book is exciting? It is of the can’t-put-it-down variety. It features daring jailbreaks and more close escapes than The Fugitive as well as more thrilling car chases than Popeye Doyle’s in The French Connection.

If you’re a boomer, you might remember some of this. Eastwood’s San Francisco cops movies are floating in it. The movies of the seventies take up the themes as a background reality. As is usual with the Left, persistence is a primary tactic and this is seen again in trying to foment race violence and diminution of the police. The hope seems to be that history will be cleansed and not provide any lesson for this generation’s efforts to stem the warfare inside.

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