Tell a lie often enough …

But some don’t need convincing through repetition: Scott Johnson on Fournier’s Lie provides an example.

“When I heard former AP Washington Bureau Chief Ron Fournier state in passing on a recent Fox News Special Report panel that “Bush lied us into war in Iraq,” I just groaned. Fournier has moved on from the AP to become senior political correspondent and editorial director of National Journal. Fournier presents himself as the moderate voice of reason and common sense, and he is a distinguished journalist, but the “Bush lied” is a staple of the hard left. I believe that the evidence in support of the proposition approaches nil.”

“If you’re going to charge that “Bush lied,” decency requires that you be able to back it up with a relevant fact or two. Fournier’s response does more than call his own judgment into question; it calls his good faith into question. Judge Silberman’s reference to “the likes of Ron Fournier” justifiably passes a harsh judgment, not just on Fournier’s statement, but also on Fournier himself, and there is no one more qualified than Judge Silblerman to render this judgment.”

When it is no longer a matter of facts and evidence but rather a matter of faith, decisions go sour. The litany of issues where the decisions will have significant social importance is large. The damage from sour decisions is also significant. On the ‘Bush lied’ meme one only has to look at the turmoil in the mid-East to see this. Then there is the anti-vaccination sour decision results showing its odor in California. Climate change, energy production, safe and inexpensive foods, health, … the list goes on and the cost of the sour decisions mount.

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