Jumping the shark at the Bay of Pigs?

There is an interesting juxtaposition in commentaries this morning.

John Fund wonders about The United States of SWAT? where “Military-style units from government agencies are wreaking havoc on non-violent citizens.”

“The proliferation of paramilitary federal SWAT teams inevitably brings abuses that have nothing to do with either drugs or terrorism. Many of the raids they conduct are against harmless, often innocent, Americans who typically are accused of non-violent civil or administrative violations.”

Then Humberto Fontova takes look at the history of the Bay of Pigs assault that happened 53 years ago.

“Where are the planes?” kept crackling over U.S. Navy radios two days later. “Where is our ammo? Send planes or we can’t last!” Commander Jose San Roman kept pleading to the very fleet that escorted his men to the beachhead (and sat much closer to them than the Sixth Fleet sits to the Libyan coast today). Crazed by hunger and thirst, his men had been shooting and reloading without sleep for three days. Many were hallucinating. By then many suspected they’d been abandoned by the Knights of Camelot.

The Cuban effort marks a point where the heart for winning went out of U.S. efforts for freedom and liberty. The militarization of the police illustrates a building of heart in political leaders for the suppression and intimidation of citizens.

In Cuba, as in Vietnam, as in Iraq, as in Syria, and as in many other places in the modern era, The president tells his forces they can’t be involved and must let those fighting for their freedom die from lack of support. But, let the opposition be one of the President’s citizens who owes a fee and it’s no holds barred to use paramilitary forces to quell that opposition.

Indeed, the U.S. Constitution’s Third Amendment, against the quartering of troops in private homes, was part of an overall reaction against the excesses of Britain’s colonial law enforcement. “It wasn’t the stationing of British troops in the colonies that irked patriots in Boston and Virginia,” Balko writes. “It was England’s decision to use the troops for everyday law enforcement.”

Just how far down this road we will go is the question.

Worried, yet?

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