Facism, thoughtcrimes, and the rule of the mob

John Hayward with More on donor lists and the Mozilla oppression:

“The intimidation factor will be huge with corporations, who don’t want to suffer through boycotts or corporate character assassinations; the path of least resistance will involve quietly checking the politics of high-profile hires, to make sure they haven’t voted or spoken in a way that might touch off the mob.  Those who seek such high-profile positions will understand that their political credentials must be kept in good order; the exercise of free speech, or providing financial support to certain issues, will be judged far more trouble than it’s worth.

“That’s how fascism works, and while you might be chilled to the bone by reading the previous paragraph, rest assured that Eich’s tormentors are delighted – it describes precisely the environment they wished to create. ”

“you can see why the improper disclosure of donor information is so unnerving to groups that oppose the dominant political culture, and why the IRS’ demands for such information from targeted Tea Party and pro-life groups were so oppressive.  There is every reason to believe Obama levels of corruption will lead such information to pass from the government to activists groups, sooner or later – and even if it’s four years later, as was the case with Brendan Eich’s little Prop 8 donation, damage can still be done.

“Such a level of paranoia is entirely unbecoming a free republic. ”

“Ultimately, the power rests with We The People. …  It is the destiny of free people to vigorously oppose totalitarianism, even when – no, especially when – the totalitarians hold a position on some issue that we personally agree with.  The method is the enemy, not its professed objectives.”

Also see Sally Zelikovsky on Brendan Eich and the new American totalitarian state.

“in the end, his personal liberties, reasonableness,  and competence couldn’t survive the pitch forks and threats.” … “This isn’t new:  we have seen it take place on a national level with Chick-fil-A.” … “This is NOT about Prop 8, gay marriage and religion.  That is just the context in which this latest abuse has come to be.  It is about the freedom — in your personal life — to believe as you do, support the candidates and issues you want, and to be left in peace to do so without fear of recrimination at the place where you make your livelihood.”

And then, see how all this fits with Professor Hanson’s One California for me, another for thee.

“Professing that you are progressive can be wise California politics. It means you sound too caring ever to do bad things, while the costly consequences of your ideology usually fall on someone else. And that someone is usually less hip, less wealthy and less powerful.”

There was a book written about how the state controlled thoughtcrimes not all that long ago. It was considered science fiction and fantasy just a generation or two ago. Perhaps it is another example of fiction and fantasy becoming fact — worried, yet?

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