Archive for politics

It won’t go away, it won’t disappear – Corruption and conspiracy evidence

Thomas Lifson found an An essential guide to the Wikileaks revelations on Hillary. “This website is not owned by or affiliated with WikiLeaks. It was made entirely for free by an American citizen who is sick of government corruption and the lack of accountability and justice in our country.”

Clarice Feldman tipped me off to what looks like a great resource, a website that organizers the vast flood of data from Wikileaks and other sources such as the FBI documents,  and focuses on the crucial issues. It is an anonymous piece of work, and the site is titled

Unquestionably, the site seems to make all the worst assumptions. As an honest prosecutor investigating public corruption ought to do while uncovering evidence and testing out those assumptions.

I have yet to explore it in depth, but what I have seen so far indictes that this is a valuable organizer of the Wikileaks data, and I hope it is updated continually.

This is the ‘polite’ side of the reaction to the exposed corruption. Those denying, defending, or trying to conceal the evidence and its plain conclusions will find that it won’t go away, it won’t disappear. It will make an impact and it will gather force. Compare and contrast to the many baseless conspiracy theories, the 9-11 truthers, for instance, where the pot simmers but does not boil because the evidence just isn’t there. As this website shows, the evidence for Clinton corruption and conspiracy is there and that existence will feed the flames to bring the simmer to a boil. 

BTW, The Oregon Bundy jury said “not guilty.” So the Feds arrested the attorney. Meanwhile the South Dakota Pipeline protest is turning violent. Yes it’s related. And the flames are being fed.

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Influence peddling

Instapundit posts a note

The Clintons don’t produce any desirable consumer products, or perform any traditionally useful services like accounting or dry cleaning. They have built no factories, dug no mines, nor worked any farms. They hold no patents and have developed no real estate. They are not medical doctors of rare skill. They haven’t starred in any hit movies or sung any popular songs. They have (allegedly) written and sold some books, but not the kind of bestsellers that get turned into TV shows and make real money.

And yet they have grown rich “beyond the dreams of avarice” since Bill left office nearly 16 years ago, and even richer since Hillary entered international politics just eight years ago.


By peddling influence — an activity which generates great wealth only in a corrupt and overly bureaucratic society.

That’s the swamp that needs to be drained, and it runs much deeper and wider than most anyone realizes.

This cites Clinton Foundation’s Fundraisers Pressed Donors to Steer Business to Former President by James V. Grimaldi and Anupreeta Das at the The Wall Street Journal.

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Blind eye

Take a look at the Bundy protests. Consider the case of a sheriff sentenced to 6 months for contempt of court because he refused to stand down in enforcing established law. Now take a look at the South Dakota Pipeline protests. Obama steers clear as North Dakota pipeline protests veer out of control.

Having lent support to the North Dakota pipeline protesters, the Obama administration is stiff-arming requests for more federal assistance as the situation on the ground at the massive encampment grows increasingly volatile.

The conflict shows signs of intensifying. Protesters set up tipis and tents Sunday in the path of the pipeline about two miles from the Cannon Ball River, declaring it “unceded territory affirmed in the 1851 Treaty of Ft. Laramie as sovereign land under the control of the Oceti Sakowin.”

Negotiating with demonstrators has also been difficult because the tribe appears to have lost control of the protest. A group of about 200 to 300 activists is driving the lawbreaking, while the protest’s leadership is split among different camps, according to law enforcement.

Rob Port, a North Dakota conservative radio talk show host who runs the Say Anything blog, warned that more federal involvement could come back to haunt the community.

“If the feds get involved, I hope it is to stand up for property rights and the rule of law, which have been trampled by the protesters,” Mr. Port said. “I’m afraid if they get involved, it will be to take up the cause of the tribe and protesters against state law enforcement, which would only further inflame this situation.”

In this case, the Indian tribe is being used by leftist activists and rioters. They lend an aura built by propaganda from the left of the peaceful native nobility such as also drives the contempt for Columbus Day. “For those living and working in Morton County, North Dakota, however, waiting for the administration to research a project already approved by state and federal regulators comes at a cost.” The citizens don’t seem to matter much to the federal government and that may be stimulating some bite. Perhaps the government’s blind eye will turn into a black eye. If not now, eventually. Think Venezuela. Then again, that might be depressing as former middle class citizens digging in the garbage for food is still not enough for people like that football quarterback to rethink their holding the heroes of the Venezuela and Cuba revolutions up on a pedestal. Yes it is happening here, the blind eye. 

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The sea is frothing – some of the commentary this morning

quite a steaming pile in circulation this morning. Take a look:

Donald Trump’s Moral Fervor By James Lewis

At a time when the “news” media betray their own hyped up values of objectivity and fairness, I am beginning to hear a growing voice of moral outrage in America – and it’s actually expressed in clear words, day after day, by the Republican nominee for president of the United States. That would be Donald Trump.

That last sentence is bound to set any lost and lonely lefty loony screaming with hysterical laughter, but hyenas are what they are. From the hyena’s point of view, Republicans are just another meat.

‘People are sick of politics’: how the US election left Reno divided and silenced — “The Nevada city is in a crucial district in the key swing state – yet the polarizing presidential race has forced residents to stop talking about who they’ll vote for”

But this year – though Washoe County is as important and hotly contested as ever – is different. This year, there are no presidential election lawn signs anywhere.

People don’t want their neighbors to know who they’re voting for, for fear of the kind of conflict that led Sanguinetti to ban the topic of politics from his establishment entirely, residents say.

Andrew Malcom says There are way too many coincidences in assaults on Trump —

A few things you’re unlikely to read elsewhere: Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy – and Americans’ ability to choose their next leader – is being destroyed by a sequence of events way too well orchestrated to be coincidental.

Let’s see, which story do you think would draw maximum interest – combing through thousands of pages of stolen documents revealing an unpopular, untrustworthy Democrat proving why she’s unpopular and untrusted. Or obnoxious TV celebrity accused with perfect timing of sliding his hand up women’s skirts, just as he had boasted on tape?

None of this addresses the truth of these charges. Clinton has often said female victims of sexual predators should be believed by default. Unless it seems they’re accusing her husband. She attacked them.

Malcom cites quite a laundry list to support his thesis. He doesn’t mention how the Wikileaks guy is reported this morning to have lost his internet access, though.

National Review says “No, the election isn’t rigged” — “denying reality doesn’t help.” But there is reason to wonder who it is that is denying reality.

As a factual matter, this is, of course, bunk. The electoral process, from bottom to top, is managed by citizens and governed by a dense body of election law. Vote-counting is heavily scrutinized by party officials and independent monitors, and irregularities are subject to legal challenge. The voting equipment used is tested prior to Election Day and carefully monitored before, during, and after. None of this is to say that voter fraud does not exist, or that errors don’t occasionally affect vote totals. But to “rig” an election at the national scale would require logistical know-how seen only in Hollywood capers. To think that the same Clinton campaign that had trouble putting away Bernie Sanders has now arranged to steal an election on a continental scale defies logic — to put it mildly.

As for the media, there is no doubt that the press hates Donald Trump with a passion, and it shows. Unfortunately, media bias is a persistent feature of our system.

Rather typical of the hubris of true believers. They cite an example that refutes their claim and make wild assertions as if they were axiomatic. A NYC election commissioner is caught on tape accepting massive voter fraud, there have been numerous cases of voter fraud in the news recently, political ads often cite Soros or the Koch Brothers, … Consider “bunk” and “to put it mildly” as indicators of just how far NR has gone in losing its perspective. Perhaps it should put more effort into understanding why what it cites might lead to the complaints it condemns.

Daniel Greenfield takes on the sieve of national security secrets in Truth is the nuclear weapon of the new cold war — “Exposing the underbelly of the American Kremlin.” He points out that it isn’t defense and trade secrets that bother the current administration but rather the expose’ of political party secrets.

But suddenly it wasn’t our defense secrets that were being spilled. It was the Democratic Party’s dirty dealings. And all the outrage and anger that had lain slumbering while our national defense secrets were being plundered by the enemy was suddenly roused to a boiling pitch.

Obama has gone to the featherbed mattresses. This means war.

Reports claim that the CIA is “is contemplating an unprecedented cyber covert action against Russia in retaliation for alleged Russian interference in the American presidential election”.

The right time to launch such an “action” would have been after Snowden or after the theft of top national security secrets by China. The OPM database hack should have merited such a response. Instead the corrupt left-wing elites running this country only respond to threats to their political power.

The CIA wasn’t allowed to strike back when its operatives were endangered. But humiliating Hillary Clinton and John Podesta must not be allowed. National security is disposable. Dem security isn’t.

That is what the Hillary Clinton email scandal was really about. The emails are a symptom. The real issue is that our leaders fear sunlight more than vampires. They cannot and will not stand the light. And so foreign dictators can trade transparency blows with them. Truth has become the political nuclear weapon. In the new Cold War, it’s not about how many cities you can destroy, but how much of the corrupt regime you can expose.

The sea is frothing, the storm clouds inspire fear, Yet it seems like that freighter that headed off to the Caribbean from Florida a while back despite a hurricane forecast. It was found later at the bottom of the sea. 

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“we already have re-education camps in America, and they are called the public schools”

Stephen Moore lets loose at the Times. Yes, I still support Donald Trump. “‘All we want from government is less of it’“.

What I don’t get about the prominent Republican defectors who have declared they are now for Hillary, is why they get this weird high off being praised by the leftists in the media. Is it really that important to them to be back on the invite list for the next Press Club Dinner? Yes I am offended by many of Mr. Trump’s actions and words. Who isn’t? But who isn’t offended and frightened more by every word uttered and action taken by Hillary Clinton? I’d vote for my pet frog over Hillary Clinton, but alas, he’s not running.

Even if you believe that Clinton and Trump are louts, why vote for the lout who will raise taxes, put three more Sodamayers on the Supreme Court, cripple our energy industry, double down on Obamacare, support partial birth abortion, and worship at the green altar of climate change? Why not vote for the lout who will do the opposite?

What is most troubling to me than the rapid-fire assaults on Mr. Trump — many of which, alas, he brought upon himself — is the denigration of his voters.

When I first met with Donald Trump many months ago, the first thing I told him was: Donald, I don’t know if I love you, but I sure love your voters. I don’t always agree with them — on issues like immigration and trade. But what I’ve come to discover is that it is the Trump movement, more so than Donald Trump himself, that is an existential threat to the establishment elites on the right and left. They are the front-line victims of government in Washington run amok. One Trump voter said it well to me at a recent rally in Colorado Springs: “All we want from government is less of it.”

Win or lose on November 8, we are not going away.

It looks like there is some learning going on in response to the Left. Those ‘re-education camps’ where the vast majority of professors and teachers are pushing propaganda of the left have grown in power and influence over the last fifty years. The continual assault on rights and freedoms shows all the persistence of terrorists at work. The response to opposition has been ugly and dishonest. The question is just how far the left can go before it is reigned in and held to account. Venezuela, Cuba, and the U.S.S.R. all provide examples of what happens when good men stand by. It may be that some have decided it is time to stand up in the U.S. before it gets that far. 

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Political suicide bombers

As Rush points out, this happens in just about every election: last minute shaky allegations often going back decades intended to destroy the Democrat’s opposition. Ace points out that this requires knee-jerk judgments.

Objections to the others are mostly about timing. Why wait until just before a political election to lodge these claims?

Now it is true that one accuser can put the courage into another to come forward. However, it’s also true that when people are doing a hit, they attempt to stampede public opinion by not giving the target time to rebut the charges. Charges like this take a while to work out — we’d have to check the aggrieved women’s claims and details against the record (was Trump flying commercial in 1995, for example).

The stampede-of-charges seems specifically designed to not permit that sort of informed, rational investigation.

NeverTrumpers are childlike in their utter unwillingess to treat a binary choice in an election as a binary choice: this is a comparison between two deeply flawed people, not a straight question about whether one of them meets your minimum threshold of acceptability.

Even assuming the charges against Trump are true, you don’t keep a victimizer of women out of the White House by agitating for Hillary; no, you just reward another victimizer of women.

But meanwhile, this man, despised by the Republican establishment (the actual power center of the party), the media, and the Democrat party, not to mention the federal bureaucracy which is now almost wholly captured by the Democrat Party, is up against a woman has already corrupted the DoJ and FBI with the full approval of the Democrat party and media and the winking indulgence of the Republican Establishment, which cheers a Republican loss as part of their internal palace purge power-play.

These are suicide bombers, people the Democrats are willing to sacrifice to achieve their desired ends. How sacrifice? They get their few minutes of fame and then, either after the election when their allegations matter no more or after a proper inspection shows the allegations were false – but then the Democrats tend to be like Muslim terrorists in that they make heroes of suicide bombers despite what they have done.

On the other hand, sometimes allegations stick. That is why the Clinton sex scandals are still on the table. The current candidate’s record in those scandals is well known and appears to have substance. Contrast this to Reid’s allegations about tax returns and Mitt Romney (and now Trump). You’d think these tactics would start to have an impact as known history of dishonesty. Maybe they have. The worry is that the gullible seem invested in their status.

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Bundy v DAPL

There have been protests about the federal government and its position on land use. The Bundy episodes in Nevada and Oregon present the classic ‘rancher versus the feds’ contest and the government was not shy in trying to assert its ‘rights’. Now there is a contrast and comparison. It is the Dakota Access Pipeline or DAPL. Valerie Richardson reports how Obama backs activists as N.D. pipeline protest spirals out of control.

The Obama administration has come under fire for aligning itself with activists fighting a North Dakota pipeline project even as the protest at the 2-month-old encampment spirals out of control.

An extreme faction within the enclave of 1,500 to 2,500 protesters camping out near the Dakota Access pipeline, or DAPL, is terrorizing the rural community with threats, vandalism and theft, as well as forcing road closures and school lockdowns, according to law enforcement.

“While some would like to say this was a protest, this was not a protest. This was a riot,” Sheriff Laney said at a press conference. “When you have that many people engaged in that kind of behavior, inciting others to break the law, cheering on others as they break the law, refusing to leave when they’re asked to leave, that’s not a protest.”

This week, Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II called on the Obama administration to intervene to stop the project, almost all of which lies on private land but would run about a half-mile from the reservation at its nearest point.

Officials in law enforcement said the uptick in violence appears to stem from a group of 200 to 300 out-of-state arrivals, described by Mr. Keller as “professional agitators,” who have infiltrated the camps near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
Arrest records show that about 85 percent of the 123 people arrested during the two-month span live outside North Dakota.

So far, however, the Obama administration has not provided assistance to law enforcement, although sheriffs in Wisconsin, Wyoming and elsewhere have responded to the emergency request for help by loaning deputies to supplement Morton County’s 34-member force.
The cost of the additional law enforcement runs about $100,000 per week, which is real money in a rural county of roughly 31,000, Mr. Keller said.

It’s the rent-a-mob, again, “terrorizing the rural community with threats, vandalism and theft.”  Also note how they have isolated a rural community and put pressure on the capabilities of that community to handle the load. A third point to compare and contrast is the purpose of the effort. It is not a ‘leave me alone’ thing as with Bundy but rather an effort to derail a commercial effort that seeks to provide necessary energy to a market, necessary for safety and well-being. 

There’s more. It’s telling. And it’s frightening. Venezuela, anyone?

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Really now, what part of life do you not understand?

I wish Joe Heck and his ilk understood humanity as well as people like Bruce Thornton.

Welcome to another debate on everything except the issues. Consider the reporting on Trump’s comments, which is the mother of all dog-bites-man-stories. I don’t know what cocoon you have to come from not to know that every single day millions of men––and women–– of all ages, races, and sexual persuasions exchange vulgar, crude banter about sex. And you’d have to be particularly dumb, or duplicitous, to be shocked that a New Yorker with a flamboyant and braggadocios personality who is involved in casinos, reality television, construction, and beauty pageants probably would do so on a regular basis. Or, if not dumb, then a partisan hack indulging in rank hypocrisy in order to gain political advantage. Welcome to another episode of America’s political hypocrisy and sexual schizophrenia.

But once again, the Democrats and their Republican fifth column think words are more important than reality.

Thornton thinks Conservatives should know better than to so quickly validate a dishonest narrative that benefits the other side.

There’s something else, though, going on––some Republicans’ bad habit of accepting identity-politics narratives about race or women, and then preemptively cringing to prove that they are not benighted racists or sexists deserving of political and social shaming. That is, the same gutlessness in the face of political correctness that in part fueled Trump’s improbable rise to become the Republican candidate for president.

Our larger public culture is equally schizophrenic. We have easy access to porn, a fashion industry that dresses even pre-teens like prostitutes, television shows and movies filled with casual sex, and an obsession with sexual beauty that drives a whole industry of surgical enhancement. Yet at the same time, we rigorously police our language and jokes for infractions of “sexual harassment,” which is what any woman at any time for any reason believes creates a “hostile and intimidating workplace,” in the words of the law. And we have redefined “sexual assault” to include bad decisions one would think a confident, strong, adult woman would see as a learning experience and try to avoid. Instead we infantilize women in terms Queen Victoria would find reassuring.

But conservatives should know better and not jump so quickly to validate a dishonest narrative that benefits the other side. True conservatism knows the traditional wisdom that talk is cheap, and that actions speak louder than words. And true conservatism recognizes that freedom is the highest secular good, but that there is no true freedom without acceptance of the consequences of one’s actions. This latest Trump episode illustrates how clearly our sexual schizophrenia marks the decline of conservatism and the dominance of progressivism in our culture and politics.

The ‘debate’ did get to issues, at least any time Trump could get a word about issues in edgewise. The underlying issue is why base human nature gets the stage while the ‘issues’ do not. This is not a condemnation of the campaigns but rather of the media and, more especially, the market the media serves. The people get what they ask for and that is the worry. Why are voters so outraged at locker room talk but not so much about the death of diplomats, a country in dire debt, a world in turmoil, and other ‘issues’? Why is corruption and lawlessness accepted while vulgarity condemned? What is going on here?

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Perspective on the election

Scott Johnson presents Ammo Grrrll on the prospect before us in BINARY FOR THEE, BUT NOT FOR ME.

From the very beginning of the primary contest, I have been confused and shocked by the vitriol aimed at Trump, and only Trump, from OUR side’s sizable glump of #NeverTrumpers. Now, as I have said repeatedly in this column, Trump was not even my 6th choice. I voted for Cruz in the Arizona primary.

But, see, Trump won and faces Hillary. What part of binary decision do “undecideds” and especially conservative #NeverTrumpsters not understand?

For better, or worse, Trump is our standard bearer and our thin, orange line against four more disastrous years of political correctness, open borders, lawlessness at the highest level, hideous Supreme Court picks, gun grabbing, deliberate security breaches, BleachBit, IRS witchhunts, another Affirmative Action hire who can’t be criticized because she’s a woman, and appalling attacks on everything military, law enforcement, traditional, or American.

It seems that some of the pundits have lived lives free of the necessity of picking between two unattractive choices. Some may not ever have had to choose between paying the electric bill (or having that shut off) or making the minimum payment on the VISA bill and paying 27% interest.

If you frequently get what you want – choosing, say, between the steak and the lobster in a restaurant – or, what the hey, just having the Surf ‘N Turf together – then you don’t think you deserve to be forced to make a less-than-perfect choice. You can stand on principle. In this case, evidently, the appalling principle of electing Hillary Clinton.

In other words, there’s a lot of folks who are comfortable enough, at least right now, not to worry about the consequences of their actions. By the time they have to live with the consequences of those actions (or inaction) it will be too late. There is a choice to be made and it will be made. Your choice, to borrow from the Little League analogy the Ammo Grrrl offered, is whether or not to swing the bat.

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Voter integrity problem? What problem?

Opponents of measures to improve ballot integrity like to deny that voter fraud exists. “Voter fraud is very rare, [and] voter impersonation is nearly non-existent,” asserts a statement by NYU law school’s Brennan Center entitled “The Myth of Voter Fraud.” That claim, so common on the left, is based on an assumption that election officials are on the lookout for fraud and mistakes. But incidents in states from Virginia to Pennsylvania to New York show that too many election officials are ignoring or even covering up the systemic problems brought to their attention. One way not to find something is simply not to look.

John Fund says When Election Officials Ignore Voter Fraud, We Need More Oversight — “Those who pretend that fraud doesn’t exist are a threat to the integrity of our elections.”

According to a 2012 Pew Research Center survey, one out of eight American voter registrations is inaccurate, out-of-date, or a duplicate. Some 2.8 million people are registered in two or more states, and 1.8 million registered voters are dead.

J. Christian Adams, who previously worked in the Justice Department’s Voting Rights Section and attended the 2009 Fernandez meeting, now heads the Public Interest Law Foundation. He has forced several counties in states such as Mississippi and Texas to clean up their voter rolls. But in many other states, his efforts have run into outright obstructionism. He was able to get voter-registration records from eight of Virginia’s 133 cities and counties, and found 1046 illegal aliens who were illegally registered to vote. In the decade between 2005 and 2015, a number of those aliens had voted some 300 times. Their presence on the voter rolls was only discovered if, in renewing their driver’s licenses, they corrected their past false claims of citizenship.

Obstructionism? That particular tactic is a common political weapon often accompanied by accusing the other side of doing the obstructing (think federal budgeting).

What is worrisome is that the courts overturn reasonable voter assurance laws based on the idea that there is no problem. First, obstruct and deny and then use the lack of overt evidence as support to avoid corrections.

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Lawless left? Where’s the outrage?

Kelly Riddell: No outrage for the lawless left — “The left’s bad behavior generates little national condemnation.”

Felon voting, illegal program funding, targeting of political enemies with government agencies, illegal document disclosure, attorney generals using their office to persecute political opponents, cronyism, withholding of public documents, …

response? a big yawn.

worried, yet?

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Under assault: Clinton Tactics?

Scott Adams describes his experiences about The Week I Became a Target. It illustrates campaign tactics in play.

This weekend I got “shadowbanned” on Twitter. It lasted until my followers noticed and protested. Shadowbanning prevents my followers from seeing my tweets and replies, but in a way that is not obvious until you do some digging.

it was probably because I asked people to tweet me examples of Clinton supporters being violent against peaceful Trump supporters in public. I got a lot of them. It was chilling.

Late last week my Twitter feed was invaded by an army of Clinton trolls

At around the same time, a bottom-feeder at Slate wrote a hit piece on me that had nothing to do with anything. Except obviously it was politically motivated.

The one and only speaking gig I had on my calendar for the coming year cancelled yesterday because they decided to “go in a different direction.”

Then they started leaving fake book reviews on Amazon to go after my book sales.

The thing is, these stories, at least the credible ones, are from one direction and they also fit a pattern that goes back twenty years or more. What is frightening is that a great mass of the electorate does not seem to care and even goes to great lengths to rationalize and deny. The price is being paid. The NFL might be showing an early measurable example.

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Gender myths tenaciously held

Mark Perry considers The remarkable academic superiority of high school girls vs. high school boys as shown in an analysis of data released by the College Board that was collected from the academic records of the 1.64 million US high school students who took the SAT in 2016.

And shouldn’t this clear academic superiority of female high school students also challenge the need for hundreds of women’s centers and women’s commissions on college campuses across the country?

I’m not sure the overwhelming evidence of female academic success from high school through doctoral programs will be enough to challenge the existence of gender activism on college campuses, and probably won’t lead to the elimination of women’s centers and women’s commissions. The “female grievance industry” is too entrenched at our universities and in society, and we’ll probably never hear about how female academic success represents such an important victory and milestone for women, that the hundreds of university women’s centers are no longer needed or justified. No, instead we’ll probably hear for generations about how important it is to monitor and report on the “status and needs of college women,” while ignoring the “status and needs” of the “second sex” on college campuses – men.

It’s a “white privilege” thing and only white men have that ‘privilege’ so, therefore, facts don’t matter if they don’t support the meme. 

The data does show that the efforts over the last forty years or so to eliminate gender bias in education, especially in STEM topics, has yielded positive results. The difficulty is in that fact that the desired outcomes have not succumbed. The idea does not seem to sink in that having more girls in the academic elite in schools does not translate into more women mathematicians and scientists earning top wages and honors. Like the anthropogenic global warming alarmists, the disconnect between the models and the reality is stunning. It should lead to trying to figure out what is wrong with the models but, instead, it only seems to stimulate doubling down on insisting that closely held models are more real than actual measure.

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Powerline connecting the dots – people who can’t think

The Powerline blog hits three current stories that connect dots, illustrate a theme, and provide some sense to nonsense. First, Hinderaker explains why he thinks Trump will win.

At one point, when I was opposing Trump during the GOP primaries, I said to the press: Stop attacking Trump! Liberal reporters often began with a valid point, but their hysterical hatred for Trump caused them to go too far, making arguments that were patently unfair and unsustainable. Therefore, the more they attacked Trump the more his support grew. The same thing is happening now: most Americans have a pretty good sense of fair play, and they know that Trump is being treated badly by the establishment–a group for whom most Americans have no great affection.

Then Johnson picks up a comment about a Clinton and Kain book and sets the stage:

Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine claim the authorship of the campaign manifesto Stronger Together, released in paperback by Simon and Schuster on September 6.

The book isn’t doing well commercially. Who wants to pay to read a party platform, even at a paperback price lower if it were published in hardcover? I’m holding out for the post-election remainder price.

At InstaPundit yesterday Glenn Reynolds mentioned the “amusing” reviews the book has garnered at Amazon. Could the “reviews” represent a groundswell of revulsion of the kind reflected in the famous Boston Globe editorial decrying “Mush from the wimp” in March 1980? I should like to think so.

Despite what he says, the commenter is not in the target market for Clinton’s manifesto. He knows too much. His memory is too good. He is too well informed.

The comment (at the link) is satire and its impact is a measure of what you know about the Clinton scandal history.

Then its another Hinderaker comment about three violent attacks where the authorities struggle vainly to support the view that they are independent and have nothing to do with Islamic terrorism or any other commonality.

Three stories have hit the news almost simultaneously; consider the features they have in common. In Philadelphia, a 25-year-old man named Nicholas Glenn walked up to a police car and started firing on the two officers inside. He then shot four civilians, one of whom died, before being cornered and killed by police officers. Glenn left behind a letter “in which he expressed hatred toward police and probation officers.”

In New York, a Palestinian named Akram Joudeh was picked up two months ago while screaming “Allahu akbar” outside a Brooklyn synagogue. He was ordered deported, and was in Midtown on Thursday appealing his deportation notice when he started attacking bystanders with a meat cleaver.

This morning, a “suspicious backpack” was discovered shortly before the race was to begin, causing organizers to cancel the event. Not long thereafter, a pipe bomb exploded in a garbage can along the route

Yeah, maybe not organized and ideologically based terrorism but it is the same fundamental issue that has NFL players playing games with the national anthem and others whose ‘free speech’ is based on ignorance and indoctrination from false propaganda. The lack of intellectual integrity is on parade. Maybe there is pushback. We will see.

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Factions and success in the small vs failure in the large

Richard Fernandez discusses ideas in the Federalist Papers that are visible in modern politics. Successful Failures is about survival of the fittest in the jungle with the local tribe as not necessarily being best for the health of the jungle as a whole. It is about factions, poisonous leaders, ruling elites, and informal networks.

The paradox that Putin exemplifies is that while factions breed formidable conspirators, they also create poisonous leaders. They succeed in themselves but cause the society around them to fail. That is because they dispense a favoritism which is ultimately ruinous for the nation. The result is a self-vetoing enterprise. Marian Tupy observed that Chile began to succeed at the moment when its junta began to allow economic freedom while Venezuela started to fail by going the other way. But few ruling elites have the sense to get themselves out of the way. Usually they have to be shoved aside.

The question is whether Madison’s defenses failed and the factions are inside the wire. America for a long time beat the odds but recently things have taken a turn for the worse. It is no accident that many of America’s troubles have coincided with the growth of identity politics, special interest groups, foreign lobbying and corruption. If so they have spread their poison and created an American version of the “informal networks” that proved so fatal in other countries, as Madison feared.

Moreover, the American factional system operates in the worst possible way. The Clinton Foundation and private email scandal is a portrait of venality without competence. The peculiar characteristics of American factionalism have bred something singular; a phenomenon at once cunning yet stupid, both corrupt and inept.

It is the freedom of the individual that is the source of accountability. If the group, the tribe, the faction becomes large enough to suppress or inhibit that freedom yet small enough for Putin like successes, then danger lurks.

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Chasing El Dorado and burning bridges

An IBT Editorial: Apple Now, Google, Amazon Next? Why EU Hates Successful U.S. Firms.

Taxes: The European Union’s laughably misnamed “competition commission” has slapped a $15 billion penalty on Apple for supposed back payments of taxes. This is nothing more than a cash grab by money-hunrgy Eurocrats, and is Exhibit A in why the EU is failing.

We’ll spare you all the dry technicalities of Apple’s case because, in fact, the EU is going after a whole slew of mainly U.S. companies that do business there — including Google, Amazon, Starbucks and McDonald’s. The reasons in each instance are as varied as the companies themselves.

In the meantime, the EU has investigations going on just about every major successful U.S. company doing business there. But companies will only take so much abuse. Sadly, the EU’s socialist-leaning rulers show no signs that they get it.

It is the quest for gold and burning the bridges on the path to wealth. It is the appeal of socialism. It is the idea that money is found and discovered and must be taken from those that have it. The problem is that wealth is created and taking it from those that have it destroys the machinery that creates more of it. 

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Ever consider the implications of what you think you want?

Jazz Shaw provides an example of dissonance where ideology is in conflict with reality. Watch: Clinton supporting small business owner realizes Dem minimum wage plan is pretty awful.

It’s just another day in the life of a presidential campaign. We have activists out in the streets arguing in favor of someone who is promising to deliver programs which fundamentally damage their own self-interests. At least in Ms. Rosenberg’s case she’s aware of the issue and the damage which is coming. How she squares that with her political views is another matter entirely.

The basic question is about the proper role of government. See Venezuela if you want an example of thinking that control of all commerce is the proper role of government. Actually seeing the destruction doesn’t seem to have any impact and that is what is (or should be) worrisome.

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The Washington Times: dissonance

The Washington Times pundits are at it again. Consider these thoughts:

Stephen Moore on What Republican turncoats forget — “If Obama/Hillary win a third race, there won’t be a conservative movement.”

I certainly don’t mean to disparage conservatives who say they won’t vote for Mr. Trump. One’s vote is a matter of personal conscience. But to actively support Hillary is to put the other team’s jersey on and then run a lap around the stadium.

It’s worth examining the case of the Republicans for Hillary, because none of the arguments make much sense.

Robert Knight describes The reality of a pipe dream — “Socialism has been at war with marriage and family for more than 200 years.”

There’s something about deploying the government as a mugger to obtain the fruits of someone else’s labor that appeals to the worst in us. But it invariably leads to poverty, dishonesty and even tyranny.

A common myth perpetuated in academia and the media is that a straight-line axis would put the Nazis and Fascists on the far right and the Communists on the far left, with Socialists in the middle. But the Communists, Nazis and Fascists are all, in fact, on the far left under the umbrella term of Socialism. On the far right would-be anarchists who believe in no government. America, with its limited government and guarantees of individual liberty, is somewhere in between.

To sort this out, here’s a tale of two cows that I didn’t originate but did embroider a bit.

Anarchy: You have two cows. You sell milk at a price your neighbors want or they kill you and take the cows.

Fascism: The state takes both and sells you the milk.

Communism: The state takes both and gives you milk — but only if you have party connections or stand in the right line.

Nazism: The state takes both and shoots you if you’re Jewish, a gypsy or a troublesome Christian.

Socialism: The government takes one and gives it to someone else. Then they come for the other, accusing you of being selfish and hateful.

Finally, there’s Capitalism: You have two cows. You sell one for a fair price to your neighbor . and buy a bull.

Speaking of family matters, in the 1930s, J.D. Unwin, an Oxford anthropologist, released “Sex and Culture,” a study from every continent over 5,000 years. He found that all cultures throughout history honored marriage, and those that abandoned monogamy soon were depleted of energy and were destroyed. This helps explain the fall of Greece and Rome.

Now, why is this important? It’s because Socialism has been at war with marriage and the family since the late-18th century. The most prominent socialist thinkers, including Rousseau, Marx and Engels, promoted the sexual revolution in which marriage and family were devalued in order to eliminate loyalties other than to the state.

As America drifts from our spiritual origins, there are signs of the socialist disease: rising obsession with redistribution and sensate entertainment, loss of virtue and respect for innocent life, mounting public and private debt, and an ever-growing government.

David Keene on Why Venezuela faces collapse — “With a socialist government and a disarmed populace, prospects are grim.”

The Venezuelan collapse is perhaps the starkest modern example of just how quickly socialism can destroy a basically wealthy, democratic nation. When Hugo Chavez came to power, the left in this country celebrated him and his policies. Hollywood types and “progressive” politicians praised him and looked forward to a demonstration of just how effectively socialism could transform a country — and that’s what everyone’s witnessed since. But it wasn’t quite the sort of transformation they expected.

Where are we headed? Where are we going? What are we likely to find? A lot of that can be seen from the travels of others and from where we have been.

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Road to perdition

Edwin Meese III and Kelly J. Shackelford describe How the lawyers plan to stifle speech and faith — “The American Bar Association’s new code must be rejected.”

Frighteningly, the ABA leaders’ statements verify that they understand — and intend — the ramifications of Model Rule 8.4. President Paulette Brown advocates that the ABA must prevent “bias” in ways that go far beyond current law. Committee member Drucilla Ramey insists bar authorities go “to the top of the legal profession” to “incentivize” attorneys to change their views and speech on these issues, views and speech often informed by attorneys’ religion. All this, despite committee testimony that such a rule has “little relation to concerns” arising in most lawyers’ offices, could be “used tactically against someone inappropriately,” and will “have a chilling effect on something that has always been in the best traditions of the bar: representing minority views and unpopular positions or clients.”

The purpose of our legal system is to ensure freedom. Popular speech rarely needs legal protection. The law protects dissenters’ right to disagree with governmental orthodoxy. It must not become a weapon to oppress those dissenters.

The ABA’s un-American censorship regime is beyond draconian; it coerces conformity regarding religious and political beliefs on a level unprecedented in American history. It borders on fascism, and must be explicitly repudiated.

Silence the opposition. Squash any debate. Maintain conformity by bringing everyone down to the pablum level. Tolerate no divergence from the ideal and spew hate and contempt on those who dare question the orthodoxy of correct politics. The road to perdition begins here.

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Decay is hard to reverse

Peter J. Wallison If you believe a President Trump could not stop regulation, think again. A precedent has been set. A small step has been taken.

After Donald Trump’s speech yesterday, many on the left hastened to note that the president doesn’t really have the power to stop the regulatory juggernaut as Trump promised. They are wrong.

Again, Congress will howl, and those of us who protested what the Obama administration was doing will agree, but it will be too late. Congress, and sadly the media, too — for wholly partisan reasons — has abandoned the principle that independent agencies are supposed to be independent, and that principle will not easily be reclaimed when a Republican president makes use of it.

Much of the principle that provided the check and balance process in governance has been eroded. Trying to reverse this is difficult and goes against the grain. See Venezuela for what going with the grain produces.

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