Archive for compare contrast

Hate

Consider Stowe Boyd:

“What the Scandinavians know: high taxes and generous social benefits do not lead to higher unemployment. On the contrary. But try to tell that to wackazoid conservatives who simply won’t look at the data.”

Then the implications from An Academic’s Shocking View: “I Hate Republicans” which concerns Professor Susan J. Douglas’ expressed hatred of Republicans.

“It’s possible to confront a “single-minded, uncomplicated, good-vs.-evil worldview” and respond with something besides hate. That, in fact, is what I am doing in this very post — and it’s something Republicans (and Democrats less hateful than Ms. Douglas) do all the time in this country.”

“I have not read the “studies” Douglas cites, but it’s clear that the qualities she describes are derisive terms for a world view that Thomas Sowell describes as “constrained.” “Dogmatism, rigidity and intolerance
 of ambiguity” as well as “a need to avoid uncertainty” represent a philosophy that recognizes the importance of incentives, and favors order even if it potentially raises the chances of individual instances of injustice. “Resistance to change” represents a support for traditions that reflect common wisdom over ages. “Support for inequality” is a nasty and unfair slur against a philosophy that prizes equality of opportunity over equality of result — and recognizes that efforts to equalize results often result in government creating power imbalances among groups, and in unintended consequences that decrease the quality of life for everyone, including the least fortunate.

In short, Ms. Douglas, there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy. While I don’t hate you, and I try not to hate even your ugly thoughts — because hate is a negative emotion that corrodes the soul — I certainly reject your hatred. I feel sorry for those who have to deal with someone so hateful. I feel sorry for your students, for your colleagues, for your neighbors, and everyone else who crosses your path and feels the sting of your nasty worldview.

And ultimately, I feel sorry for you — because you’re clearly proud of your hatred, which means you are unlikely to change. Which means you’re trapped — you have trapped yourself, that is — in a situation I don’t envy: a life driven by negative emotions and ugliness.”

Hate distorts. It leads people to defensiveness and that to a lack of intellectual integrity that can be seen in logical fallacies such as Boyd’s conclusion.

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Uber and the taxi wars of the 60′s continue

You may have heard of Uber. It is a modern take on taxi service that is encountering resistance from the established business model. The Las Vegas Review Journal describes a bit of the history of this struggle: Taxi wars’ of ’60s predate today’s stand-off with Uber.

“Taxi regulations are overseen by the Nevada Taxicab Authority, which was established in 1969 after more than a decade of confrontations among cabdrivers that casino executives feared were getting so violent that they would discourage tourists from coming to Las Vegas.”

“Many of the “taxi wars” battles were waged between union drivers represented by the Teamsters Local 881 and nonunion drivers for companies such as Checker Cab”

“Over the years, statutes were modified and the five-member Nevada Taxicab Authority remains in place and only regulates taxis in Clark County. Cabs that operate in other counties are administered by the Nevada Transportation Authority, which also regulates buses, limousines, towing and moving van companies.”

“The authority board’s top objective is to best serve the riding public. But state statutes have other criteria that the public has been quick to criticize as anticompetitive and protectionist.”

Of course, the usual pattern: Union violence stimulates anti-competitive regulation that is promoted under the banner of public safety and order in commerce. What has changed? 

personal accountability via capitalist incentives.

The taxi companies primary service, that of dispatch, now no longer needs to be centralized as an app on the cell phone can do most of the work. Instead of having to depend upon the reputation of the taxi company, potential riders can now investigate the reputation of a particular driver. The scene is changing and it will take time to determine the implications and work them out to acceptable solutions. Once again, it is those playing by the old rules up against those who want to make new rules. Let’s hope it doesn’t repeat the violence from past taxi-wars.

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Race relations

The Ferguson Fracas has not helped in promoting sympathy for the minority. The administration has had to backtrack from his promotion of violence that has escalated out of a false story used to foment unrest. As one said, it was rather unnerving to see the President talking about ‘understanding’ the need for protest while the split screen news showed black thugs and rioters gleefully hauling booty out of a liquor store.

The problems in the black family are also being put on parade. M. Catharine Evans describes Michael Brown Parents’ Bad Influence Plays Out on the National Stage

“As bad as Sybrina Fulton’s neglect and financial exploitation of little angel Trayvon Martin was, Lesley McSpadden’s profanity-laced rant after the grand jury decided not to indict Officer Wilson makes Fulton look like Mother of the Year.

Take a listen to Mama McSpadden and Michael Brown’s convicted felon stepdad, Louis Head. Yes, the same pair, along with twenty others who allegedly tried to crack a few skulls after they caught granny and a cousin selling Michael Brown merchandise in Ferguson a month ago.”

“These poor excuses for parents are as much to blame for Michael’s death as Michael himself, so why isn’t the media blaming them instead of the cops? Maybe we’ll all worry about police accountability when issues of accountability are resolved with respect to the sperm donors and baby mamas raising or not raising these scourges of society.

Holding these two accountable won’t be easy. After the McSpadden-Head video went viral, McSpadden’s lawyer, Benjamin Crump, tried to quell the criticism. Crump suggested that McSpadden and Head were overcome with “raw emotion.””

As for the media, headlines still list it as cop vs ‘unarmed teenager’ rather than 300 lb 18 year old caught on video abusing a store clear bullrushing a cop.

The awakening is noted by Colin Flaherty who says Black Mob Violence Now a Sickness

“And no one is sicker than the reporters who ignore, condone, excuse, and even encourage it, as we learned from the latest riot.

For reporters, Mike Brown has always been a moving target: At first the Gentle Giant was cut down for no reason whatsoever. Reporters ate it up and black mob violence followed.

When that fairy tale evaporated, they replaced it — with ease.”

“I learned from a black reporter that because the district attorney of St. Louis took 25 minutes to explain the grand jury decision that was proof positive the cop should have gone to trial. And reason enough to riot.”

“I learned the rioters did not like the tone of the District Attorney’s remarks. And that is why they did it.”

I learned black mob violence is “understandable,” or so quoth the President of the United States.

“Megyn Kellly — the devotee of the damages of white privilege — agreed with a black guest who said the rioters threw molotov cocktails because St. Michael was left in the street for four and half hours.”

“a former Republican White House staffer said it was all about police-community relations. Roughly translated that means too many black people were breaking the law. And too many white cops were catching them.”

“I learned that cops in riot gear cause riots.”

“I learned that black mob violence is no big deal because white people do it too.”

“No one mentioned Louisville, and how last Spring 200 black people rampaged through that downtown, beating grandparents in front of their grandkids, destroying property, stealing, looting, and creating mayhem.”

“PBS was kind enough to report that all of that black mob violence was the result of “white racism.””

“Violent crime in America is a black thing. Like the T-Shirt says, I don’t understand it. But this I do know: as bad as black crime rates appear to be (compared with non-black rates) in reality they are even worse.

And here are four reasons why: stitches for snitches, witness tampering, Bronx juries, cutting arrests in half, for starters.”

The list of behaviors should be stimulating research papers in psychology and social studies as it fits a pattern of known illness. Denial runs deep. It is not healthy, either for its victims or its observers.

UPDATE: see also Trayvon and Mike at Powerline.

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Delusion and denial observed

Tammy Bruce is rather harsh about Democratic delirium and denial; post-election ‘analysis’ spins every name but Obama.

“One thing is clear: At least at this point, most liberal commentators, writers and “influencers” are refusing, or unable, to grasp what happened on Tuesday night. This is a bad sign for their party and agenda. We know the Democrats have always been out of touch with reality, but the degree of denial since the election has been stunning.

“Watching this meltdown is also instructive for Americans in general, who must ask the question: How did we let such a disconnected and dumb bunch of people gain so much power? We are romantics, but the midterms remind us if you scratch the surface of any smug, arrogant liberal, you’ll find a clueless, malevolent and incompetent harpy.”

The sad thing is, it’s not only about the results of the mid-term elections but also about positions on major issues. It is instructive to observe behavior, but even that is subject to denial from people who do not like their own behavior. 

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Another ten reasons

Danusha V. Goska describes Ten Reasons Why I Am No Longer a Leftist with experiences and examples. It is worth careful reading and consideration. The ten reasons often show up in observations elsewhere but this list provides context and is powerful in the compilation. The top reason: “If hate were the only reason, I’d stop being a leftist for this reason alone.” can be easily seen by anyone and is perhaps a base for the other nine.

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Quackademic

persistence, redefinition of words, anti Western Culture, … It’s quackademic! At Respectful Insolence, it’s  Tooth Fairy science about traditional Chinese medicine, promoted in the Wall Street Journal.

“There’s a term that I wish I had coined but do frequently use to describe this infiltration: Quackademic medicine. Over the last 30 years or so, what was once quackery, rightly dismissed in a famous 1983 editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine as a “pabulum of common sense and nonsense offered by cranks and quacks and failed pedants who share an attachment to magic and an animosity toward reason” has become mainstream, evolving from quackery to “alternative medicine” to “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM) and finally to “integrative medicine.”

“At each stage, the idea was to rebrand medicine based on pseudoscientific, mystical, and/or prescientific beliefs as somehow being co-equal with “Western” or “scientific” medicine through the clever use of language, whose latest term, “integrative” medicine is a near perfect Orwellian twisting of language meant to imply that what is happening is the “integration” of what advocates of integrative medicine like to call the “best of both worlds.”

“If you want to see just how successful quackademic medicine has been at not only infiltrating itself into what should be bastions of science-based medicine but at changing the very terms and language under which it is considered, just look at this article that appeared in the Wall Street Journal yesterday by Shirley S. Wang entitled A Push to Back Traditional Chinese Medicine With More Data: Researchers Marry Modern Analytical Techniques to Centuries-Old Theories on What Makes People Sick

“In the meantime, let’s take a closer look at the article. It’s based entirely on the very hubris behind “integrative medicine,” namely that medicine based on prescientific and religious beliefs, like traditional Chinese medicine, is at least nearly co-equal with medicine based on science and rigorous clinical trials. Or, at least, it would be equal to scientific medicine if there were actually some evidence for it, which these brave maverick doctors and scientists are furiously searching for, no matter how much they have to torture modern systems biology and molecular biology techniques to shoehorn TCM’s fantasy-based “networks” into networks of gene activity being increasingly understood by modern molecular biology.”

“Lots and lots of research money is being wasted studying prescientific superstition such as qi, yin and yang, and “hot” and “cold” applied to human disease, and universities are embracing such twaddle with both arms.”

“It should anger you. It should anger anyone who cares about science and medicine. Sadly, the reaction of the vast majority of physicians is a shrug.”

That shrug seems to be common to many ideas being pushed that threaten who we are and what we have gained over the last two centuries. Do read the shrug link. Some are indeed getting worried.

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Elucidating the differences

A top ten list going around (see Hayward at Powerline). “I vote Democrat because …

Number 10.  I love the fact that I can now marry 
whatever I want. I’ve decided to marry my German Shepherd.

Number 9. I believe oil companies’ profits of 4% on a gallon of gas are obscene, but the government taxing the same gallon at 15% isn’t.

Number 8. I believe the government will do a better job of spending the money I earn than I would.

Number 7. Freedom of Speech is fine as long as nobody is offended by it.

Number 6. I’m way too irresponsible to own a gun, and I know that my local police are all I need to protect me from murderers and thieves. I am also thankful that we have a 911 service that gets police to your home in order to identify your body after a home invasion.

Number 5. I’m not concerned about millions of babies being aborted so long as we keep all death row inmates alive and comfy.

Number 4. I think illegal aliens have a right to free health care, education, and Social Security benefits, and we should take away Social Security from those who paid into it.

Number 3. I believe that businesses should not be allowed to make profits for themselves. They need to break even and give the rest away to the government for redistribution as the Democrat Party sees fit.

Number 2. I believe liberal judges need to rewrite the Constitution every few days to suit fringe kooks who would never get their agendas past the voters.

And, the Number 1 reason … I think it’s better to pay $billions$ for oil to people who hate us, but not drill our own because it might upset some endangered beetle, gopher, or fish here in America. We don’t care about the beetles, gophers, or fish in those other countries.

a concise contrast and comparison between the ideological views at issue in U.S. politics?

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Some are worried – may have reason to be

A make it up world?

“Progressives thought that because traditional protocols, language and standards were usually created by stuffy old establishment types, the rules no longer necessarily should apply. Instead, particular narratives and euphemisms that promoted perceived social justice became truthful. Bothersome facts were discarded.

“So far, political mythmaking has become confined to popular culture and politics, and has not affected the ironclad facts and non-negotiable rules of jetliner maintenance, heart surgery or nuclear plant operation. Yet the Ebola scare has taught us that even the erroneous news releases and fluid policies of the Centers for Disease Control can be as likely based on politics as hard science.

“If that is a vision of more relativist things to come, then we are doomed.”

Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist and historian with the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He seems worried. Should you be as well?

Then there’s Christopher Harper who says Hard numbers can’t alter media narrative on vote fraud. An assertion that there isn’t any voter fraud is one that the Left uses to oppose such anti-fraud measures as Voter ID. Who’s right?

“A significant study detailing an incredible amount of voter fraud in the past two national elections was released recently, but few news organizations gave the results any notice.

“The study found that noncitizens registered to vote in U.S. elections and have cast ballots, largely supporting Democratic candidates.”

Sometimes the ‘make it up world’ becomes an effort to create a fantasy by trying to manipulate reality. Perhaps there is cause for worry.

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Forty years after and Vietnam learns capitalism

It took forty years after being abandoned to the communists but Vietnam has discovered what capitalism can bring. The mindset there is a comparison and contrast to that in the U.S. as Glenn Harlan Reynolds explains in How we ‘won’ in Vietnam, but are losing at home.

But the Vietnamese advantage may boil down to this: Free markets are new there, whereas America has had them for a long time. Scientist Thomas Ray once said that every successful system accumulates parasites, and the free market in America has been successful for a very long time. Established businesses get tied down with regulations that keep out new innovations — like Michigan’s GM-backed anti-Tesla law that bars car makers from selling directly to the public — while politicians line up to line their pockets with taxes and fees and campaign contributions.

The question is what it will take to get the U.S. back on track. That is what worries.

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The puzzle: how can it be?

Burt Prelutsky says that RINOs are not the Enemy and then gets into the rather puzzling beliefs that seem so common.

“In spite of the fact that states that allow their citizens to carry concealed weapons, liberals are convinced that the Second Amendment should be made null and void. In spite of falling temperatures, they believe that Al Gore’s warnings about global warming are as close to gospel as they care to get. In spite of his lies about ObamaCare, Benghazi, the IRS and Ebola, they are convinced that Obama is an honest man.

“Furthermore, they believe that the Republican House is filled with obstructionists who stay awake nights trying to figure out ways to thwart the people’s’ will in spite of the fact that Harry Reid stops every House bill in its tracks, refusing to even allow the other 99 members the opportunity to do what they’re paid to do; namely, vote.”

“Again, I understand that some people hate to confront reality and prefer to say that both parties are the same, and if there isn’t a Ted Cruz or a Mike Lee on the ballot, they prefer to stay home on Election Day, indulging in the luxury of feeling themselves superior. Which would be bad enough, but they then spend the next two, four, six or eight years, whining about how the liberals are ruining the country.”

“It seems that Mayor Parker is unaware of the fact that sexuality, for better or worse, has been a legitimate concern of religion at least since the days of Sodom and Gomorrah. It’s only been in recent years that liberals have managed to turn these matters into political fodder as they’ve gone trolling for votes and financial support in some very peculiar places.

“Yet at the same time that Christian pastors are being hassled, Muslim ministers go their merry way, indoctrinating our prison population, long an ideal recruiting ground, particularly among black inmates, for Islamic terrorists.

“In the meantime, our State Department, which often seems to get its marching orders from our sworn enemies in the Middle East, endorsed a Muslim handbook that promotes Sharia law and refers to jihad as a noble pursuit.”

It doesn’t make sense. It is a puzzle. But then, that’s assuming that people actually think and hold intellectual integrity as a positive value.

Worried, yet?

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The search for equality: will they ever learn?

At the end of the 18th century, there were two great Western revolutions — the American and the French. Americans opted for the freedom of the individual, and divinely endowed absolute rights and values.

“A quite different French version sought equality of result. French firebrands saw laws less as absolute, but instead as useful to the degree that they contributed to supposed social justice and coerced redistribution. They ended up not with a Bill of Rights and separation of powers, but instead with mass executions and Napoleonic tyranny.

“Unfortunately, the Obama administration is following more the French model than the American.”

Professor Hanson describes Obama’s Ideal Revolution and the inevitable outcome.

“Official stories change to fit larger agendas.” … “We are back to the daily revisionism” … “Once-nonpartisan federal agencies are now in service to the goal of changing America from cherishing an equality of opportunity to championing an equality of enforced result.

“Our revolutionary inspirations are now Georges Danton, Jean-Paul Marat, and Maximilien de Robespierre, not the Founding Founders.”

Think about it. Take a look at the actual history of nations and the health and welfare of their peoples. Why do so many ignore the misery to delve into fantasies again and again? Why do they expect different results this time?

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Vietnam redux

Bruce Walker describes Obama’s Vietnam

“The very preventable Holocaust that Cambodia and Vietnam endured happened because of gutless American presidents and in spite of the courage and honor of our fighting men.

“Whatever the faults of George H. Bush, he fully grasped the reasons we failed in Vietnam, and he scrupulously avoided those in Desert Storm, a war against a much more powerful Iraq (we tend to forget that the battle-tested Iraqi army had outfought, in a decade-long war, an Iranian army three times as big.) We had a specific goal, and we used every weapon we had to achieve that goal. Leftists at the time predicted that this would be “another Vietnam,” but they were utterly and pathetically wrong.

“Obama, now, is demonstrating that it is possible to repeat all the mistakes of Vietnam.”

This is just another example of conveniently distorting history. Columbus Day used to be a celebration of exploration and discovery and now many try to make it an example of Western Culture oppression. Forget the context of the times or what really happened. Paint the picture to suit one’s fantasies. Again, in the mid-East, the effort is to squash the oppression of Western Culture and bash the U.S., especially. Overlook the tragedy and try to ignore the suffering. Again.

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Commitment

Professor Hanson asks Bomb or occupy — or neither? and says “Blowing things up and going home allows trouble to reignite.”

“Wars usually end only when the defeated aggressor thinks it would be futile to resume the conflict. Lasting peace follows if the loser is then forced to change its political system into something other than what it was.

“Republican Rome learned that bitter lesson through three conflicts with Carthage before ensuring that there was not going to be a fourth Punic War.”

There are plenty of examples to compare and contrast. Where the U.S. upheld its commitment after victory in Germany, Japan, the Balkans, and Korea and where it did not as in Vietnam and Iraq. Will we ever learn?

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The reluctant warrior who doesn’t learn from history

Gary Anderson says If You Liked Vietnam, You’ll Love the War With the Islamic State.

President Obama is repeating three key strategic mistakes that President Johnson made in Vietnam. First, he has embarked on an open ended commitment; there was no measurable end state. … f the president’s aim is to destroy the military forces of the Islamic State, he is making the second mistake by thinking it can be done by airpower alone. … That brings us to President Johnson’s third great mistake; he allowed North Vietnam to become a sanctuary.

Young progressives of Barak Obama’s generation were taught by their professors that the Vietnam War was an evil undertaking few had the inclination to seriously study. Obama himself described it as one of the “dumb wars” when he was a candidate. There are no dumb wars; there are however, wars fought in a dumb manner. Our president appears to be embarking on one.

Vietnam was one of the first military wins that was given away by a government that got tired of the carry through and abandoned an ally by emptying its promises of continuing support. Iraq was another such episode. In both cases, the human cost has been tragic. Now its trying to fix one case by ignoring what history can tell us — again.

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aspirational vs envious

It’s New York measured against Hong Kong. Richard W. Rahn – Hong Kong, an aspirational society to emulate – “The currency of Hong Kong is effort, rather than envy”

Why is Hong Kong succeeding while New York City is receding? They are both world-class cities with about the same per-capita income and great natural harbors.

Hong Kong, like Singapore, South Korea, Chile and Switzerland are aspirational societies, rather than societies consumed with envy, like France. Work, saving and investment are not punished in aspirational societies, and there tend to be less social conflict and a higher level of civility. The United States used to be an aspirational society, but has increasingly become an envious society.

The leaders of China understand that aspirational societies work and those based on envy do not — but an aspirational society requires both economic freedom and individual liberty. Those who seek to control the lives of others, whether they are in Beijing, Paris or Washington, fear aspirational societies and thus, seek to regulate them — out of existence.

Envy, hate, and greed – it isn’t capitalism but rather the take from those who have to give to those who appear to need (or those who are friends of those in power). Powerful emotions overwhelm the ability to learn from history or from reality.

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Moral outrage

The Slut Walk epitomizes liberal moral outrage against morality itself. It’s also a tragic metaphor for our era’s weird revolt against sanity and time-tested truth about human nature.

Robert Knight onHow a moral code outrages the secular left – “The notion of personal responsibility gives the secular severe heartburn”

It’s a long list and Knight provides selected examples.

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Weed and booze

The argument is often made that weed is safer than booze. That is the logical fallacy in extremis. True enough, maybe, but R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. delineates a clear difference in how these drugs are usually used.

One enjoys the scotch for the taste. With scotch, there are scores of different tastes. One drinks a single malt. One drinks a blend. The same is true with bourbon and all manner of alcoholic drinks. One imbibes for the taste, then for the refreshment, finally for the relaxed feeling it imparts. Very, very finally, some drinkers drink a scotch and soda to get blitzed and drop out. Maybe the pathetico drinks to pass out or to throw up. A true alcoholic is a sad spectacle. A drunk is a person who has ruined many a good drink.

Consider the increasingly civilized option, marijuana. One smokes a joint to get stoned and steadily to drop out. Is that really civilized? I have never heard of a connoisseur savoring a joint for the taste. One smokes it for the effect.

Smoking used to be considered something bad. That appears to be changing, as least as long as it isn’t tobacco. As social acceptance increases, the risks and results of weed will become more evident. Perhaps it will spawn an industry like tobacco did and then where will they be? It is the ‘big corporation’ aspect of tobacco that helps make it a target of the left.

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Equal Protection Under the Law?

It is a comparison between Exxon and Ivanpah. Coyote Blog takes a look at Equal Protection Under the Law? when it comes to energy producing companies.

You can see from the last line that the Feds don’t seem to be even considering a penalty, but are just considering whether they should permit such plants in the future. If the 28,000 figure is correct, this company should be getting $196 million in fines (the Exxon rate of $7000 per bird) if there was any such thing as equal protection. Even the company’s admitted figure of 1,000 a year is almost 60 times as high as Exxon was penalized for, despite the fact that Exxon experienced the deaths across hundreds of locations in five states and this is just one single solar plant.

What it costs is no longer a measure of feasibility. The side effects only matter depending upon context. — nice if you can afford it.

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No, they are not all the same

Paul Mirengoff notes how Democrats tilt towards Hamas and blame Republicans for their position.

“What explains the fact that Democrats now see Israel as no better than Hamas in a war precipitated by Hamas’ rocket attacks on Israel and its refusal to accept a cease fire.

“Pro-Israel liberals have come up with an odd but not unexpected excuse: it’s the Republicans’ fault.

This, as Mandel notes, was the thesis of the Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg back in 2012. He argued that by criticizing President Obama for his policy towards Israel, Republicans make “supporting Israel distasteful to many Democrats.” Worse, they cause Democrats to “lump supporters of Israel in the same category they reserve for climate-change-denying anti-choice Obamacare haters.”

“As question-begging arguments go, this one belongs in the Hall of Fame.”

“The obvious answer is that ideology drives contemporary Democrats to view Israel far less favorably than Republicans view Israel. The political fallout — criticism by Republicans of Obama’s Israel policy and the identification of the Israel-U.S. alliance with the GOP rather with both parties — is a symptom of the difference in the way the two parties view Israel, not its cause.

What accounts for the underlying ideological difference between the two parties when it comes to Israel? The answer, I think, is this: Israel is a U.S. ally with strong Western values and a willingness to use military force when necessary to protect itself.”

“Many Democrats are uncomfortable with one or more of these attributes. Their ambivalence towards the U.S. and its values causes them view a hardcore U.S. ally skeptically (or worse). “

Then you can take a look at the recently uncovered Lerner Email messages or the partisan vote regarding any attempt to reign in executive expressions of power …

there is a difference, a wide gap, between political parties in the U.S. despite what some may claim. 

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Moral and tactical insanity – its us providing the motivation

Krauthammer thinks it is Rare moment in international politics where “international politics present[s] a moment of such moral clarity.”

“Here’s the difference between us,” explains the Israeli prime minister. “We’re using missile defense to protect our civilians and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles.”

“To deliberately wage war so that your own people can be telegenically killed is indeed moral and tactical insanity. But it rests on a very rational premise: Given the Orwellian state of the world’s treatment of Israel (see: the U.N.’s grotesque Human Rights Council), fueled by a mix of classic anti-Semitism, near-total historical ignorance and reflexive sympathy for the ostensible Third World underdog, these eruptions featuring Palestinian casualties ultimately undermine support for Israel’s legitimacy and right to self-defense.”

The fact that such clarity does not seem to matter to so many also shows in the recent shootdown on a Malaysian jetliner as well. It also is evident in domestic political scandals and such expressions as AG Holder’s “racist” rationale.  

Then there is that cheating study in Germany that seemed to indicate that those who lived longest under the Soviet socialist regime were more likely to be a bit dishonest in their play. 

How to right an insanity can be especially difficult when the very concept is denied.

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