Urban show and tell

This one gets into different strokes for different folks. The example is something to think about in terms of how culture is changing and why people own an Airstream RV.

What seems to be a new trend is a rally parallel parking on a busy city thoroughfare for a show and tell. See Capi Lynn: Oregon has the third-largest Airstream club in the nation

Twenty members are expected to set up camp on Main Street for Friday and Saturday nights in what they hope will be the first of many urban rallies the club holds in the future in small towns across Oregon.

“Our goal is to bring people to the downtown and spread the joy of camping and Airstreams,” said Kathy Ellis-Kelemen, a club member in Salem.

There is some dissonance here. Bring people downtown to spread the joy of camping? Is a fancy RV the essence of camping or, perhaps, is it the plastic bag a homeless person is using for his downtown camping?

This is group stealth camping disguised as an RV trade show (see the RVIA calendar). It seems more about glamping rather than camping as the idea of putting one’s RV up for display on a public street seems it would create many barriers to actually using that RV for a few days. This is like those shows about prepping houses for sale and how the requirements for a good sales show disrupts using the house for living. The RV does fit right into the modern fad for tiny houses, though.

What seems to be missing here is the social aspect of a WBCCI rally. How can you commune with other ‘birds of a feather’ if most of your rally time is spent guarding your significant investment while strangers parade through it gawking at your possessions? Is the effort inner directed in the hubris of showing off or is it outward directed towards the objectives of the WBCCI (constitution Article III):

to afford opportunities for outdoor fraternization of recreational vehicle owners; to encourage safe driving and assist in improving the general welfare of the recreational vehicle public through assistance and active participation of all its members in building a strong organization for the betterment of good will toward recreational vehicle travel; to coordinate the interest and activities of its Regions and Units; to cooperate with other organizations within its sphere of interest which are seeking to elevate the standards and ethics of the various groups; to disseminate information of an advisory and educational nature which will be of value to its members and the public; to study, advise and recommend legislation in the interest of the recreational vehicle public and to oppose all legislation which is discriminatory and injurious to the recreational vehicle public and to encourage government and private agencies to provide more and better recreational vehicle parks and facilities.

The connections seem weak but then WBCCI members have shown little proclivity in recent years for introspection and discussion about their club behavior, values, and identity.

 

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