Tires

Tires are something you should be able to take for granted. Tread wear is seldom a concern for trailer tires. There are some things you should do to make sure your tires live to a ripe old age and to make sure that you minimize the risk of failure as much as possible.

The first issue is to make sure you have the right tires for your trailer. Size is most obvious as the tires have to fit on your wheels and have sufficient clearance in your wheel wells.

Tire type will usually be ST (special trailer) or LT (light truck). ST tires have better aging protection while LT tires are more likely radials and may provide a better ride.

Load rating has a hidden gotcha. It needs to be just right and not too small nor too large. Excess tire capacity may be more than your wheels can handle, require higher pressure filling, and can create a harsh ride that can damage your trailer over time. Insufficiently rated tires will run hot and might fail at an innoportune time.

Keeping proper tire pressure is one of the most important routine maintenance items you can do. If in doubt, fill to the max rated pressure specified on the tire sidewall. Check the tire pressure before each trip and daily while on the road. When you check tire pressure you should also make sure your lug nuts are tight, too.

The Michelin RV tire guide
http://www.michelintruck.com/michelintruck/pdf/RVTIREGUIDE1.pdf

A petition calling for tire dating
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/nhtsa_tire_dating.html

Are you a high-tech redneck?
http://www.strangecosmos.com/content/item/104284.html

astronomy picture of the day
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/

The museum of unworkable devices
http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/museum/unwork.htm

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