Archive for Living

Thinking of buying? Watch out.

When I put a 26′ Argosy up on Craig’s List not too long ago, I was rather surprised by the scam warning – and by the advice to go cash only as even cashier’s checks can bounce (see nerdwallet). Sure enough, more than half the inquiries I got from the ad fit the Craig’s List warning profile. But that isn’t the half of it.

Steve Lehto, an attorney in Michigan, says on YouTube Don’t Drive While In Possession Of Cash!. His 18 minute video is about civil asset forfeiture. If you get stopped by a guy with a flashing light, gun, and uniform (law enforcement officer) for some reason or other and he sees you have a good chunk of cash, he can take your cash on the pretext that it was ill gotten gains. You have to sue to get it back and that can be time consuming and costly. As with a lot of things, the risk may be rather small but it needs attention. Lehto provides an explanation about why it should be a concern.

Most people have never heard of Civil Forfeiture and are unaware that the police can seize cash from you and claim that it is the product of a criminal enterprise. They do this, often with no evidence, and they get to keep the money! This problem is widespread and there is a simple solution. I explain the solution but I know that the politicians will not fix this problem because of the way they profit from it. —

Is a cashier’s or certified check a risk? Here is what the FTC says:

However, just because funds are available on a check you’ve deposited doesn’t mean the check is good. It’s best not to rely on money from any type of check (cashier, business or personal check, or money order) unless you know and trust the person you’re dealing with or, better yet — until the bank confirms that the check has cleared. Forgeries can take weeks to be discovered and untangled. The bottom line is that until the bank confirms that the funds from the check have been deposited into your account, you are responsible for any funds you withdraw against that check.

So what do you do? The FTC site has a list of ways to protect yourself and some other good information. 

OK. That’s the money side. How about the product side? Lehto has some good videos about purchasing used vehicles, warranties, and the various issues that can be encountered. 

Caveat Emptor! It pays to know what you are doing. A friend can help, especially one with the experience necessary to check for condition of the mechanical parts and who knows what is important and what is less so. A friend can also help balance out the emotional side of things, too. You also need to know values and that should come from the ‘blue book’ sources as well as from watching actual sales and examining advertisements and from web sites that provide value information that shows how condition, age, and features all impact price.

Then there’s the DMV. In Nevada, it used to be the big problem was just getting the owner’s signature in the right box on the back of the title. Now it’s a case of having to download forms from the DMV website and making sure they are all filled out properly. That Argosy was titled in the name of the family trust and that now requires a notarized trustee signature for a vehicle sale. Things are getting complicated. Take care.


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1 in 200 on the Oregon Trail

Preparedness Advice talks about Foods Carried on the Oregon Trail that provides an interesting comparison for the modern traveler.

The Oregon Trail was an exhausting, sometimes treacherous, 2,000-mile journey that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon and locations in between. Over half a million stalwart souls were brave enough to leave the relative comfort of civilization at that time and venture off into strange and unknown lands.

We know a surprising amount of the Oregon Trail experience because so many travelers wrote journals, sent letters home, and even wrote books and newspaper articles. True Accounts of Life in a Covered Wagon and Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail are vivid, first-person accounts of this harrowing journey.

Most of these pioneers traveled by covered wagons, which were pulled by oxen and horses. Those wagons carried not only passengers and a few personal belongings, but over 1000 pounds of food! They were hoping to add to those food stores with hunting, fishing, and foraging, but none of that was guaranteed, so they had to give careful consideration to the most essential food items.

The journey from beginning to end took from 4 to 6 months. When you think about how much food your family consumes in that time frame, it’s a lot of food.

Travelers brought books, Bibles, trail guides, and writing quills, ink and paper for letters. About one person in 200 kept a diary.

Then consider what they had for roads, maps, directions, and all those other things we take for granted today.

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Summer reading

Looking for something with a bit less fluff than the usual for keeping the mind exercised this summer without having to dip into the wallet? Take a look at the U.S. Army Center of Military History.

On Vietnam, the volumes include Military Communications: A Test for Technology and Engineers at War as well as everything from a history of the special forces to logistics to medical evacuation to social and general history material. 

Choose your war, from the Revolution to Iraq and you’ll find reading on about any military topic from unit histories to medal winner stories to global government and social issues. There’s enough good stuff to find your own gems.

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Mosquitoes, Zika, and Consumer Reports

Lifehacker reports that the Consumer Reports’ Mosquito Repellent Rankings Are Now Available for Free. It’s been a rather wet spring in NW NV and that means not only a lot of weeds but also a lot of bugs, including mosquitoes. A decent repellent can make for a much more comfortable outing.

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Dog owners, consider your image

Bert Gildhart is a nature photographer. He recently ran across on ugly situation coming to the conclusion that Barking Dogs Not Compatible with Organ Pipe’s Sounds of Silence.

The event was precipitated by a confrontation I had with two sets of campers parked adjacent to us who had barking dogs. Barking was not confined to just a yip, rather it was sustained, and it occurred randomly throughout the day and into the evening.

But the “evil” lady (her husband did not join her) in site 135 marched over and launched into me using every imaginable word she could muster up. She said her dog didn’t bark and that I was a so-and-so liar. I told her to leave and when she turned I told her to have a good day. She turned around and again started dropping her F bombs. Then she stomped off yelling that I was a F—— Nazi.

I should note that for a number of years Janie and I traveled with a Malmut, which we trained not to bark, so it can be done! I should also note that about 50% of campers at Organ Pipe were traveling with dogs, but they, too, had apparently trained their dogs, for most pets did not engage in that horrible nonstop yip, yip, yip.

OK, that’s now in the past. Today, we hope to make it to Death Valley and enjoy the “Super Bloom.”

The problem is that the obnoxious dog owners were probably fully aware of their pet’s behavior and its interference with fellow camper’s enjoyment of the campground yet they not only failed to consider this social impact but added to it by mounting an assault on anyone who would dare to complain. In doing so, they branded other dog owners and this hurts everyone and destroys the camaraderie that we can usually expect from the RV community. It is one thing to have your own problems. It is entirely another to foist them on your neighbors. And it compounds the issue when you assault anyone who dares to object to your nuisance.

Yes Gildhart could have moved on but so could have the obnoxious dog owners. The context indicates that perhaps the dog owners should have moved to camp in a dog kennel for a better match to their circumstances.

Be considerate of both your neighbor and the environment. Leave both in better condition when you leave than when you arrived. 

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Nighttime decorations

Solar lights are a great addition to our off grid rally sites. Lights that need electricity are used for our infrequent rallies at places with hookups. Creativity is also evident in the way we string up lights and the methods for holding stake lights upright on hard ground.

RV lights

See the photo gallery!

Now to come up with excuses and rationales about why anyone would want to light up the campground. Identify the RV so you can find it when returning from an outhouse trip in the middle of the night? Marking hazards to help people about hitting them and possibly getting hurt?

The reality is that the solar powered lights are low intensity illumination that provides decoration and utility for the camp. See the pictures and decide for yourself.

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Pulp rags: the I’net to the rescue for light reading

Back in the day – you know, when you paid money to have paper piles covered in ink delivered to your mailbox – there were publications devoted to tales and adventures to entertain for the breaks in the day. The Pulp Magazine Project is an archive of fiction from 1896 to 1946.

The Pulp Magazines Project is an open-access digital archive dedicated to the study and preservation of one of the twentieth century’s most influential literary & artistic forms: the all-fiction pulpwood magazine.

The Project is dedicated to fostering ties between communities of collectors, fans, and academics devoted to pulp magazines, and will offer opportunities for research and collaboration to both scholars and enthusiasts alike. We will provide information on upcoming conferences and conventions, and promote new working relationships between academics and the hundreds of pulp fans, scholars, and collectors beyond the college and university.

Pulp originally referenced the quality of these magazines’ paper: using coarse, untreated paper made from wood-pulp kept production costs low, allowing large shipments of the magazines to be distributed and sold as cheaply, and as far away, as possible; or, without advertising. It was an incredibly successful formula; by 1915, 8 best-selling titles had the combined monthly circulation of 2.7+ million copies—an estimated readership of 15% of the U.S. population.

The PMP archive of digitized magazines consists of full-text, cover-to-cover scans produced in collaboration with a variety of partners.

For SciFi fans, has the IF collection.

If was an American science fiction magazine launched in March 1952 by Quinn Publications, owned by James L. Quinn. The magazine was moderately successful, though it was never regarded as one of the first rank of science fiction magazines. It achieved its greatest success under editor Frederik Pohl, winning the Hugo Award for best professional magazine three years running from 1966 to 1968. If was merged into Galaxy Science Fiction after the December 1974 issue, its 175th issue overall.

For a bit heavier fare, don’t forget the Gutenberg Project. These are all digitized which means you can put a library in a tablet sized device that would otherwise take over the entire RV. One caveat is to be careful about how well the translation between the original publication and your reading device was done. The IF collection seems to have rather poor epub and Kindle versions, for instance. The fallback is always just straight text. 

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Batteries: looking on down the road

Major advances often come with a confluence of tools and technologies. That may be happening with energy stores where the RV lifestyle, the survivalist ethos, the ‘alternative energy’ appeal, electronic power devices improvements, and control devices are all contributing towards personal sized energy collection, storage, and usage at reasonable costs. Patrick Mannion says Battery Storage Systems Shine With Solar Deployments in EE Times.

The hidden concept is that the RV may grow out of being a parasite on your home’s electrical system but may become a part of it. The RV and its energy collection and storage devices may become a component serving the household energy needs.

A complication in this is in trying to get cost effectiveness distinct from political ideologies and governmental interference.

Technologically, the efficiency of solar cells continues to increase and module costs continue to fall, to the point that it has increasingly become a viable option in many developed regions as well as an alternative to diesel in regions such as Africa.

That said, solar’s cost parity with conventional power sources remains a discussion shrouded in controversy, nuances, biases and misinformation, much of it due to subsidization of both solar cell manufacturing and deployments.

This at the forefront of some Nevada heat as the Public Utilities Commission decided that the energy company can pay wholesale rather than retail rates for household solar system excess energy and also charge for other costs involved in accommodating small systems into its power grid. As one politician said: it is one thing for you to spend your own money for what you want but it becomes something to discuss when you want your neighbor to pay a part of your costs.

As to exactly what technology might float to the top, there are a lot of options with no clear winners.

advanced storage options include ultracapacitors (not a battery chemistry, but counted as an advanced storage mechanism for the purposes of the report) as well as battery chemistries such as lithium sulfur (LiS), magnesium ion (Mg-ion), solid electrolyte, next-generation flow and metal-air.

There is change and some of it is being seen in RV systems.

This trend toward including ESS [electricity storage systems] with solar deployments has had an interesting effect on architecture and converter design approaches (Figure 4). When battery storage was a rarity, the battery was charged by tapping the mains supply, via an AC-DC converter. When the AC went down, the battery would switch in via a DC-to-AC inverter.

All the parts had to be bought separately, battery, inverter, and metering, while multiple voltage conversions led to unnecessary losses and overall inefficiencies. Even the metering wasn’t too exciting.

Now, that’s changed. A full system can be integrated, including the PV monitoring and DC-DC conversion to charge the battery, as well as the inverter. Metering has advanced to ZigBee or other wireless technologies to provide either computer or app-based monitoring of the entire system.

Mannion mentions Tesla’s Powerwall, a $3,500, 10-kWh storage system for the home, business and utilities. Install that in an RV, hang it on a closet wall, and provide the proper connection to your household system and you’d not only get a good sized energy storage in your RV but also a means to supplement household peak energy needs as well. There are possibilities there and a few things to work out but the future does look interesting.

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Don Featherstone, R.I.P.

U.S. News reports that Don Featherstone, creator of pink plastic lawn flamingo, dies in Massachusetts at 79.

Featherstone, a trained sculptor with a classical art background, created the flamingo in 1957 for plastics company Union Products, modeling it after a bird he saw in National Geographic. Millions of the birds have been sold.

His legacy lives on at many Airstream gatherings. What is about the pink flamingo yard decoration and an RV rally is something to ponder – some other time, some other place.

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Minimize the problem: Mosquitos and other “Protection against arthropod bites”

Indefinitely Wild has a good rundown on What You Can Do About Mosquitos.

On that turkey hunt in a mosquito-infested valley in the eastern Sierra foothills, I applied a 50 percent DEET lotion to my baseball cap and, during the day, wore permethrin-impregnated, full-coverage clothing. At night, I slept unprotected, first in a stand of trees next to the river that enjoyed a constant breeze, then the next night on the ground, in still air next to the car. Before going to bed, I placed the Thermacell on a rock a few feet away and made sure it was fitted with a fresh pad. I was armed with a head net, just in case, but didn’t use it.

The result? After two nights and two days in mosquito central, I found two bites on my right wrist. I guess nothing’s a 100 percent guarantee, but there absolutely are effective methods and products to keep mosquitoes from sucking your blood.

Your RV is a partial solution, too, but have you checked for your supply of repellent to make sure it is fresh for the coming season? What other precautions are appropriate so you can (a) enjoy the outdoors and (b) protect the inside for a good night’s sleep?

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For the survivalist or some interesting reading of classic home how-to literature

The Survivor Library says it is about how to survive when technology doesn’t – classic survivalist meme. The Library Index includes 106 categories of ‘how-to’ out of copyright books. The cookbooks collection has an extensive collection mostly from the 19th century up to about 1922. The books are available in both PDF and epub versions. The epub version works for your eBook reader but sometimes the conversion has glitches.

If you are interested in science, technology, and home-making as it was 150 years ago, this library should provide many interesting resources.

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RV Composting Toilet Thoughts

The Wynn’s YouTube channel has several videos about their RV composting toilet experience. Composting Toilet Secret Tips and Tricks is a good place to start if considering this option. Nature’s Head Dry Composting Toilet / Standard Crank Handle (Amazon affiliate link) is a popular example of the appliance. There are a few things to consider about composting toilets in an RV:

  • The RV composting toilet costs 3 times (or more) that of a typical RV toilet.
  • Proper composting requires aeration, 50F or better temperatures, 50% (+/- 10%) moisture content, and weeks to months of time.
  • Disposal of waste remains an issue. The Wynn’s experience is that they need to dump the urine bottle every 2 or 3 days and the compost bucket every 2 to 3 weeks.
  • The RV toilet needs a continuous electrical supply to keep its ventilation running. That is key to smell management, aeration, and moisture removal.
  • Water use may be a bit less. The typical RV toilet needs enough water to keep solid waste in the tank covered. A composting toilet only needs enough to clean the bowl.
  • A composting toilet needs to be ‘primed’ with peat moss or something like Worm Factory COIR250G10 Coconut Coir Growing Medium 250g – 10 pack (Amazon) to help aerate the feces and optimize decomposition.
  • Flushing the RV composting toilet involves cranking the aeration and maceration paddles.

Some cabin and house type composting toilets can get really sophisticated. The big issues that complicate the operation are that of removing moisture, allowing for a proper composting time, managing temperature, and facilitating final disposal.The RV toilet manages moisture by operator attention to separating feces and urine into separate containers, depending upon mild ambient temperatures, forced continuous ventilation, and removal of waste prior to complete decomposition. 

The comments I see indicate some of the same issues and attitudes regarding waste disposal as occur with gray water. With regulations and laws getting ever more strict, disposal of any biologic waste outside of specially designated places should be assumed to be prohibited. You might get away with dumping the urine bottle in a privy or toilet but the compost is another issue.

RV toilet compost should be handled and treated much the same way as cat litter. It should be considered dried out rather than composted. Some toilets allow rotating compost buckets to help further composting but the RV situation with a total bucket time of only a week or two with additions within a day or two of disposal isn’t going to do much other than start the initial phases of composting. The week or two does provide a good composting start and does remove a lot of moisture and that tends to reduce the volume and weight of the waste. The result isn’t the sort of thing to put in a privy or other toilet. It also isn’t the sort of thing to spread out in the open. That leaves bag and trash or shallow burying (if allowed).

There are a number of DIY composing projects out there. The RV provides a few opportunities for such a system. For example, the air feed for the toilet could come from the top of the refrigerator heat exchanger. That would help refrigerator efficiency as well as provide pre-warmed air for the compost pile. Both the compost pile air exhaust and the urine bottle could be routed into the RV black tank to reduce the necessary waste disposal intervals. 

The standard RV toilet works well for most RV needs and provides a fairly high barrier for competing technologies. What seems to give composting toilets an edge for some are ideological fantasies. These center on ‘green’ ideas like saving water or recycling or personalized waste handling. Perhaps the old style gopher hole should be considered for comparison. As with all waste, the issue is really more a problem of concentration than it is with where it goes.

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RV swamp cooler on the cheap

Burning Man fallout: DIY portable camping PVC pipe evap air conditioner by graywolf.

What he built is a tube framed by PVC pipe with a Fantastic Endless Breeze fan at the top, a tub at the bottom, wrapped in cooler pad material, and a small 12v water pump to circulate water. The fan runs about $70 and the pump under $15. Tub, pipe, and pad are common hardware store items and should run well under $50 with the pads the most expensive item (e.g. Dial Mfg. 3072 Dura-Cool Pads at ~$16 ea).

If you are looking at the RV Motorhome Solar Battery 12-Volt Evaporative Swamp Air Conditioning Cooler that runs nearly $600 and want to see what evaporative cooling will do in your RV and what it takes, the DIY project makes for an inexpensive experimental apparatus. The most expensive part of the DIY swamp cooler is the Fan-Tastic Vent 01100WH Endless Breeze 12V Fan and that is a nice item to have even as just an RV table fan.  The KEEDOX® DC30A-1230 12V DC 2 Phase CPU Cooling Car Brushless Water Pump Waterproof Submersible isn’t that expensive and appears to be a general purpose submersible 12v low volume water pump. (note: Amazon affiliate links – check ’em out and support this site!).

You might start the experimenting using the bathtub as a water reservoir. If you want automatic water filling, add a standard cooler float valve connected to the RV water supply. The two variables you will want to watch are water and power consumption. A few amps and a gallon or two of water per hour can make a big dent in an RV reserves over a hot afternoon.

Note: waste water is an attractive source for an evaporative cooler. The Burning Man have worked on that, too (see the Zyphers post on the evapotron). To use gray water for indoor cooling would require a water treatment plant to filter the waste water, apply a disinfectant, and, perhaps, a bit of perfume. — Possible but needs a bit of effort and care.

Power needs could be handled with a 100 watt or better solar system. The cost of that (think $4 per watt as a good guide) could be shared with other RV electrical power needs.

Another basic cooling device is shade. Awnings are a good start. Putting one of those 10×10 tent gazebos over the RV might also help. The problem with any of these is the afternoon Zephyrs as they can come with strong enough gusts at times to cause havoc with awnings and light structures.

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Trailering, 1952

Josh dug up Living in a Trailer by James Jones from the July 1952 edition of Holiday Magazine. Some things haven’t changed much in 63 years — some have.

“THE FIRST TIME you tow a house trailer you keep jerking the wheel to compensate for that crazy sway in the back end. It takes a long time to get enough used to it to ignore it. The first haul I ever made with mine—a trip that, although I didn’t know it then, turned out to be the first leg of a junket that would take me clear across the country and back and consume a year and a half—was to Memphis, Tennessee, from my home in Illinois. That’s about 400 miles, and it took me four days to make it. A year and a half later, on my way home from California, I hauled from Tucson, Arizona, to El Paso in one day. I had left a green-eared neophyte, and I was coming back a veteran. There is no pride in the world more rabid than that of a confirmed and dedicated trailerite. The next winter I took my trailer to Florida in four days, just about 1,200 miles.”

check it out. People, parks, and tours back when.

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Coffee water

There is a page on Coffee in the Owner’s Guide that mentions the key ingredient but that ingredient is often overlooked in the obsession about beans and roasting and procedures and protocols. The science behind the perfect coffee is a report on research to find out just how the water can influence the taste of coffee. Here are some highlights from the report.

“Hendon used computational chemistry methods to look at how different compositions of water affect the extraction of six chemicals that contribute to the flavour of coffee, along with caffeine. The study, published in the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, found that water composition can make a dramatic difference to the taste of coffee made from the same bean.

“Hendon explained: “Coffee beans contain hundreds of chemicals; the precise composition depends on the type of bean and how it is roasted. The flavour of the resulting coffee is determined by how much of these chemicals are extracted by the water, which is influenced by roast time, grind, temperature, pressure and brew time.

“We’ve found that the water composition is key to the proportions of sugars, starches, bases and acids extracted from a particular roast.”

“The coffee industry uses guidelines on the ideal water for coffee extraction from the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe (SCAE), which measures ionic conductivity to quantify the total dissolved solids, however the researchers found that it was the proportions of these ions that Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood, co-author on the paper, said: “Unfortunately most of the time you are limited by the source water available. Water from the tap varies regionally and from day to day depending on how much it rains affected the extraction and therefore the taste of the coffee.

It seems a bit of magnesium is better than sodium but they key to keep in mind is that this taste stuff is getting into the weeds. Both the water minerals and the coffee taste chemicals are in very small amounts and you don’t have a whole lot of control over them. In an RV, you deal with what you can get as you travel. Use the tastes you encounter as another local phenomena to enjoy like the scenery and other attractions.

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Popcorn with an aluminum can

There are those hot air type popcorn poppers but electricity and special gear aren’t necessarily a good thing in the RV. There are those Jiffy Pop (Jiffy Pop – Amazon Affiliate link) but you can also use an aluminum can and a few kernels. Eric Ravencraft describes how to turn an aluminum can into a DIY popcorn popper. Cut a flap for a popped corn deflecter and make a handfull with minimal hassle.

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Spring cleaning: 25 tips

Paul Michael has 25 Essential Tricks for Quick and Easy Cleaning over at WiseBread. These are mostly about uses of vinegar and baking soda and similar well tried recipes with a few techniques and hints. Examples:

“Use a tube sock on your hand, soaked in warm water, to wash your blinds. You can do both sides at once and balance the blind.”

“Simple dryer sheets, like Bounce, rubbed onto your baseboards will clean them up a treat. And as a bonus side effect, they coat them in a way that repels dust and pet hair.”

“Repair Hardwood Floor Scratches – All you need is a walnut. By rubbing a walnut into the shallow scratches, their natural oils help hide the flaw. It’s an age-old carpenter’s trick.”

It’s always handy to keep a list like this easy to find – sometimes it might just make life a bit easier, a bit cleaner, and better smelling!

For books on the subject, see Household cleaning recipes on Amazon (affiliate link). Many have Kindle editions so you can take them along without cluttering your RV!

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Read cheap; take it with you

The University of California Press has made 700 books available for reading free of charge. OpenCulture has the story.

“The University of California Press e-books collection holds books published by UCP (and a select few printed by other academic presses) between 1982-2004. The general public currently has access to 770 books through this initiative. The collection is dynamic, with new titles being added over time.”

The University of Chicago Press also provides some free material.

The OpenCulture page also has a number of links to other resouces that provide free media including eBooks, audio books, and movies.

If you have a Kindle reader, check out dailyfreebooks for thousands of free eBooks including promotional copies as well as copyright expired material.

Of course, don’t forget Project Gutenberg, the “first producer of free ebooks” based on volunteer efforts.

Then there is the local library. Did you know many loan books for eBook readers? For example, you can find a book at the Washoe County Library website and it will not only tell you which branch has the book available or allow you to place a hold on the book, it will also tell you if the book is available in the electronic edition. To help you out, there are even workshops such as the one at the North Valleys Library branch on January 18.

What is nice about the electronics media revolution is that you can haul around significant personal libraries and not burden your RV. Thousands of books or movies will fit in a typical backup drive or eBook reader or tablet.

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Firearms in camp court decision

Eugene Volokh reports that “Today’s Morris v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (D. Idaho Jan. 10, 2014) strikes down an Army Corps of Engineers regulation barring possession of loaded guns in recreation areas surrounding Corps dams.” In this case, a tent was considered akin to a home. Second amendment rights are protected in homes.

“The court also holds that the Second Amendment protects the right to carry guns as well as to possess them at homes, so that the regulation is unconstitutional even as to carrying outside tents. And the court rejects the argument that the government may restrict such gun possession and carrying on the grounds that the government owns the property, and has no obligation to open the property to the public in the first place.”

An RV is also “akin to a home” so a firearm you have in it should fall under the same judgment.

It used to be that having a firearm handy for protection while camping was no big deal. The comments to Volokh’s post show how this has changed. There is still a need in the wilds for protection and self defense but some folks think there is a danger from firearms that outweighs this need. Sometimes that thinking is so strong it results in court cases. The courts are a bit confused which is why Volokh warns that “It’s not clear how the opinion will fare on appeal, but the case should be interesting to watch.

Whatever your opinion, if you do have firearms with you on your RV experience, make sure you maintain your shooting skills, keep up to date with laws and regulations where you travel, maintain the equipment in good condition, and store it properly for travel.

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Smoothies at camp with tools at hand

lifehacker notes a video about making watermelon smoothies with just a drill, a coat hanger, and, of course, the watermelon.

You may have a cordless drill driver for the stablizer jacks on your trailer and a coat hanger or other stiff wire isn’t that difficult to find. All you need to do is to cut a hole in the watermelon to allow you to get the wire bent into a beater shape inside. Then use the drill to blend the insides. Finally, fix a spout to poor out the smoothies. (food safe rated coat hangers, anyone?)

“the whole process takes seconds and leaves no messy cleanup behind. Just watch out for the seeds in that pulpy watermelon puree you’re about to enjoy. If you want to amp up the flavor a little bit, you could probably pour a little something into the watermelon after you’ve pulled the drill back out”

I wonder if it works and tastes as good as it sounds easy to do.

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